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Open AccessArticle

Perceived Benefits and Barriers of a Community-Based Diabetes Prevention and Management Program

School of Public Health, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA
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J. Clin. Med. 2018, 7(3), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm7030058
Received: 16 February 2018 / Revised: 4 March 2018 / Accepted: 9 March 2018 / Published: 13 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Endocrinology & Metabolism)
This study examined the perceptions of benefits of and barriers to participating in a community-based diabetes program to improve program effectiveness. The Diabetes Prevention and Management (DPM) program was a twenty-two session, 1-year program, modeled after the evidence-based National Diabetes Prevention Program and AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors framework. Community-based participatory research approach was used to culturally tailor the curriculum. Participants included overweight or obese adults with dysglycemia. A benefits and barriers survey was developed to gather information on participants’ perception of the program, as well as information on demographics and health literacy levels. Eighty-nine adults participated in the DPM program (73% females; 62% diabetic; 77% had adequate health literacy); 79% of participants completed the benefits and barriers survey. Principal component analysis indicated two components representing benefits (Cronbach’s α = 0.83) and barriers (α = 0.65). The majority perceived high benefits and low barriers to program participation; benefits included helpful interaction with health coach or program leader (73%), improved lifestyle modification (65%) due to the program, and satisfaction with the program (75%). Open-ended questions confirmed themes related to benefits of program participation, suggestion for programmatic improvements as well as barriers to participation. Participant feedback could be used to guide interventions and tailor future program implementation. View Full-Text
Keywords: diabetes; lifestyle modifications; intervention; benefits; barriers; health literacy diabetes; lifestyle modifications; intervention; benefits; barriers; health literacy
MDPI and ACS Style

Shawley-Brzoska, S.; Misra, R. Perceived Benefits and Barriers of a Community-Based Diabetes Prevention and Management Program. J. Clin. Med. 2018, 7, 58.

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