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Review

Recent Developments in Nanomedicine for Pediatric Cancer

1
Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
2
School of Business, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
3
Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115, USA
4
Department of Molecular Medicine, The University of Texas Health at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA
5
Greehey Children’s Cancer Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA
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Division of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors have contributed equally to this work and share senior authorship.
Academic Editor: Nikolas Herold
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(7), 1437; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10071437
Received: 16 January 2021 / Revised: 20 March 2021 / Accepted: 23 March 2021 / Published: 1 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Current Treatment of Childhood Cancer)
Cancer is the second biggest cause of death in children in the US. With the development of chemotherapy, there has been a substantial increase in the overall survival rate in the last 30 years. However, the overall mortality rate in children with cancer remains 25%, and many survivors experience a decline in overall quality of life and long-term adverse effects caused by treatments. Although cancer cells share common characteristics, pediatric cancers are different from adult cancers in their prevalence, mutation load, and drug response. Therefore, there is an urgent unmet need to develop therapeutic approaches specifically designed for children with cancer. Nanotechnology can potentially overcome the deficiencies of conventional methods of administering chemotherapy and ultimately improve clinical outcomes. The nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems can decrease the toxicity of therapy, provide a sustained or controlled drug release, improve the pharmacokinetic properties of loading contents, and achieve a targeted drug delivery with achievable modifications. Furthermore, therapeutic approaches based on combining nanoformulated drugs with novel immunotherapeutic agents are emerging. In this review, we discussed the recently developed nanotechnology-based strategies for treating blood and solid pediatric cancers. View Full-Text
Keywords: pediatric cancer; nanoparticles; drug delivery system; liposome; leukemia; lymphoma; osteosarcoma; Ewing sarcoma; glioma; blood–brain barrier pediatric cancer; nanoparticles; drug delivery system; liposome; leukemia; lymphoma; osteosarcoma; Ewing sarcoma; glioma; blood–brain barrier
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yang, S.; Wallach, M.; Krishna, A.; Kurmasheva, R.; Sridhar, S. Recent Developments in Nanomedicine for Pediatric Cancer. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 1437. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10071437

AMA Style

Yang S, Wallach M, Krishna A, Kurmasheva R, Sridhar S. Recent Developments in Nanomedicine for Pediatric Cancer. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2021; 10(7):1437. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10071437

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yang, Shicheng; Wallach, Mia; Krishna, Apurva; Kurmasheva, Raushan; Sridhar, Srinivas. 2021. "Recent Developments in Nanomedicine for Pediatric Cancer" J. Clin. Med. 10, no. 7: 1437. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10071437

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