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Article

Opposing Role of Trust as a Modifier of COVID-19 Vaccine Uptake in an Indigenous Population

1
Department of Economics and UHERO, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
2
Department of Anatomy, Biochemistry and Physiology, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA
3
Department of Pediatrics, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: François Meurens
Vaccines 2022, 10(6), 968; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10060968
Received: 13 May 2022 / Revised: 14 June 2022 / Accepted: 14 June 2022 / Published: 17 June 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) Vaccination and Compliance/Hesitancy)
Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders (NHPIs) were disproportionately impacted by COVID-19 and remain significantly under-vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2. To understand vaccine hesitancy, we surveyed 1124 adults residing in a region with one of the lowest vaccination rates in Hawaii during our COVID-19 testing program. Probit regression analysis revealed that race/ethnicity was not directly associated with the probability of vaccine uptake. Instead, a higher degree of trust in official sources of COVID-19 information increased the probability of vaccination by 20.68%, whereas a higher trust in unofficial sources decreased the probability of vaccination by 12.49% per unit of trust. These results revealed a dual and opposing role of trust on vaccine uptake. Interestingly, NHPIs were the only racial/ethnic group to exhibit a significant positive association between trust in and consumption of unofficial sources of COVID-19 information, which explained the vaccine hesitancy observed in this indigenous population. These results offer novel insight relevant to COVID-19 mitigation efforts in minority populations. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; health disparities; trust; sources of information COVID-19; health disparities; trust; sources of information
MDPI and ACS Style

Juarez, R.; Phankitnirundorn, K.; Okihiro, M.; Maunakea, A.K. Opposing Role of Trust as a Modifier of COVID-19 Vaccine Uptake in an Indigenous Population. Vaccines 2022, 10, 968. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10060968

AMA Style

Juarez R, Phankitnirundorn K, Okihiro M, Maunakea AK. Opposing Role of Trust as a Modifier of COVID-19 Vaccine Uptake in an Indigenous Population. Vaccines. 2022; 10(6):968. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10060968

Chicago/Turabian Style

Juarez, Ruben, Krit Phankitnirundorn, May Okihiro, and Alika K. Maunakea. 2022. "Opposing Role of Trust as a Modifier of COVID-19 Vaccine Uptake in an Indigenous Population" Vaccines 10, no. 6: 968. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10060968

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