Next Article in Journal
Neuronal Transmembrane Chloride Transport Has a Time-Dependent Influence on Survival of Hippocampal Cultures to Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation
Previous Article in Journal
Human Periapical Cyst-Derived Stem Cells Can Be A Smart “Lab-on-A-Cell” to Investigate Neurodegenerative Diseases and the Related Alteration of the Exosomes’ Content
Open AccessArticle

Endocrine Disruptors Induced Distinct Expression of Thyroid and Estrogen Receptors in Rat versus Mouse Primary Cerebellar Cell Cultures

1
Department of Physiology and Biochemistry, University of Veterinary Medicine, 1078 Budapest, Hungary
2
Gedeon Richter Plc., Gyömrői út 19–21, 1103 Budapest, Hungary
3
Department of Animal Physiology and Animal Health, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Szent István University, Páter Károly u. 1, H-2100 Gödöllő, Hungary
4
Department of Comparative Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(12), 359; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9120359
Received: 12 November 2019 / Revised: 1 December 2019 / Accepted: 4 December 2019 / Published: 5 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience)
The endocrine system of animals consists of fine-tuned self-regulating mechanisms that maintain the hormonal and neuronal milieu during tissue development. This complex system can be influenced by endocrine disruptors (ED)—substances that can alter the hormonal regulation even in small concentrations. By now, thousands of substances—either synthesized by the plastic, cosmetic, agricultural, or medical industry or occurring naturally in plants or in polluted groundwater—can act as EDs. Their identification and testing has been a hard-to-solve problem; Recent indications that the ED effects may be species-specific just further complicated the determination of biological ED effects. Here we compare the effects of bisphenol-A, zearalenone, and arsenic (well-known EDs) exerted on mouse and rat neural cell cultures by measuring the differences of the ED-affected neural estrogen- and thyroid receptors. EDs alters the receptor expression in a species-like manner detectable in the magnitude as well as in the nature of biological responses. It is concluded that the interspecies differences (or species specificity) in ED effects should be considered in the future testing of ED effects. View Full-Text
Keywords: bisphenol A (BPA); zearalenone (ZEN); arsenic (As); estrogen receptor α (ERα) and estrogen receptor β (ERβ); thyroid receptor α (TRα) and thyroid receptor β (TRβ); primary cerebellar neurons bisphenol A (BPA); zearalenone (ZEN); arsenic (As); estrogen receptor α (ERα) and estrogen receptor β (ERβ); thyroid receptor α (TRα) and thyroid receptor β (TRβ); primary cerebellar neurons
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Jocsak, G.; Ioja, E.; Kiss, D.S.; Toth, I.; Barany, Z.; Bartha, T.; Frenyo, L.V.; Zsarnovszky, A. Endocrine Disruptors Induced Distinct Expression of Thyroid and Estrogen Receptors in Rat versus Mouse Primary Cerebellar Cell Cultures. Brain Sci. 2019, 9, 359.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop