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Brain Sci. 2018, 8(2), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8020021

Nucleus Accumbens Deep Brain Stimulation in Patients with Substance Use Disorders and Delay Discounting

1
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Faculty, University of Cologne, Kerpener Straße 62, 50937 Cologne, Germany
2
Department of Psychology, Biological Psychology, University of Cologne, Bernhard-Feilchenfeld-Straße 11, 50969 Cologne, Germany
3
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Kraepelinstraße 2-10, 80804 Munich, Germany
4
Department of Psychiatry, Otto-von-Guericke-University of Magdeburg, Universitätsplatz 2, 39106 Magdeburg, Germany
5
Pychosomatic Hospital Buching, Rauhenbichl, 87642 Halblech, Germany
6
Department of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, Medical Faculty, University of Cologne, Kerpener Straße 62, 50937 Cologne, Germany
7
Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatic, Johanniter Hospital Oberhausen, Steinbrinkstraße 96a, 46145 Oberhausen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 December 2017 / Revised: 24 January 2018 / Accepted: 25 January 2018 / Published: 27 January 2018
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Abstract

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shows first promising results in patients with severe substance use disorder (SUD), a patient group known to have deficits in self-control. One facet of self-control is the ability to forego smaller sooner rewards in favor of larger later rewards (delay discounting, DD). The NAc has been suggested to integrate motivational information to guide behavior while the consequences of NAc-DBS on DD are unknown. To this end, nine patients with SUD performed a DD task with DBS on and after a 24 h DBS off period. Furthermore, 18 healthy controls were measured to assess possible alterations in DD in patients with SUD. Our findings implicate that DD was not significantly modulated by NAc-DBS and also that patients with SUD did not differ from healthy controls. While null results must be interpreted with caution, the commonly observed association of impaired DD in SUD might suggest a long-term effect of NAc-DBS that was not sufficiently modulated by a 24 h DBS off period. View Full-Text
Keywords: delay discounting; substance use disorder; opioid use disorder; alcohol use disorder; deep brain stimulation; nucleus accumbens; self-control delay discounting; substance use disorder; opioid use disorder; alcohol use disorder; deep brain stimulation; nucleus accumbens; self-control
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Peisker, C.B.; Schüller, T.; Peters, J.; Wagner, B.J.; Schilbach, L.; Müller, U.J.; Visser-Vandewalle, V.; Kuhn, J. Nucleus Accumbens Deep Brain Stimulation in Patients with Substance Use Disorders and Delay Discounting. Brain Sci. 2018, 8, 21.

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