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Prevalence and Clinical Significance of Symptoms at Ultra High Risk for Psychosis in Children and Adolescents with Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder: Is There an Association with Global, Role, and Social Functioning?

1
Child and Adolescence Neuropsychiatry Unit, Department of Neuroscience, Children Hospital Bambino Gesù, Piazza Sant’Onofrio 4, 00165 Rome, Italy
2
Office Médico-Pédagogique Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry, University of Geneva School of Medicine, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland
3
Scuola di Psicoterapia Cognitiva APC-SPC, Viale Castro Pretorio, 116, 00185 Rome, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Brain Sci. 2018, 8(10), 181; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8100181
Received: 31 August 2018 / Revised: 29 September 2018 / Accepted: 29 September 2018 / Published: 30 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vulnerability to Schizophrenia and Psychosis)
In literature nothing is known about the clinical significance of Ultra High Risk (UHR) symptoms in children and adolescents with diagnosis of obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). In this study, we examined the prevalence of UHR symptoms and their relationship with severity of obsessive–compulsive symptomatology, global, social, and role functioning, and level of associated depressive symptoms in a clinical sample (n = 51) of children and adolescents aged between 8 and 17 years with a diagnosis of OCD. The prevalence of UHR symptoms in this sample was 43.1%. We divided the whole sample into two groups: children and adolescents with OCD and UHR symptoms (n = 22) and children and adolescents with OCD without UHR symptoms (n = 29). Our findings suggest that the group with OCD and UHR symptoms shows worse global, social, and role functioning than the group with OCD without UHR symptoms. No differences were found on the severity of obsessive–compulsive symptomatology, the number of psychiatric diagnoses associated, and the level of depressive symptoms. The presence of UHR symptoms in children and adolescents with OCD could cause significant functional impairment and should be considered in order to plan specific and targeted therapeutic interventions. View Full-Text
Keywords: obsessive–compulsive disorder; psychosis; ultra-high risk; functioning; child and adolescent psychiatry obsessive–compulsive disorder; psychosis; ultra-high risk; functioning; child and adolescent psychiatry
MDPI and ACS Style

Averna, R.; Pontillo, M.; Demaria, F.; Armando, M.; Santonastaso, O.; Pucciarini, M.L.; Tata, M.C.; Mancini, F.; Vicari, S. Prevalence and Clinical Significance of Symptoms at Ultra High Risk for Psychosis in Children and Adolescents with Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder: Is There an Association with Global, Role, and Social Functioning? Brain Sci. 2018, 8, 181. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8100181

AMA Style

Averna R, Pontillo M, Demaria F, Armando M, Santonastaso O, Pucciarini ML, Tata MC, Mancini F, Vicari S. Prevalence and Clinical Significance of Symptoms at Ultra High Risk for Psychosis in Children and Adolescents with Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder: Is There an Association with Global, Role, and Social Functioning? Brain Sciences. 2018; 8(10):181. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8100181

Chicago/Turabian Style

Averna, Roberto, Maria Pontillo, Francesco Demaria, Marco Armando, Ornella Santonastaso, Maria L. Pucciarini, Maria C. Tata, Francesco Mancini, and Stefano Vicari. 2018. "Prevalence and Clinical Significance of Symptoms at Ultra High Risk for Psychosis in Children and Adolescents with Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder: Is There an Association with Global, Role, and Social Functioning?" Brain Sciences 8, no. 10: 181. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8100181

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