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Neuromodulation for Pelvic and Urogenital Pain

by Holly Roy 1, Ifeoma Offiah 2 and Anu Dua 2,*
1
Neurosurgery Department, University Hospitals Plymouth, Plymouth PL6 8DH, UK
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospitals Plymouth, Plymouth PL6 8DH, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2018, 8(10), 180; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci8100180
Received: 14 August 2018 / Revised: 27 September 2018 / Accepted: 28 September 2018 / Published: 29 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuromodulation for Intractable Pain)
Chronic pain affecting the pelvic and urogenital area is a major clinical problem with heterogeneous etiology, affecting both male and female patients and severely compromising quality of life. In cases where pharmacotherapy is ineffective, neuromodulation is proving to be a potential avenue to enhance analgesic outcomes. However, clinicians who frequently see patients with pelvic pain are not traditionally trained in a range of neuromodulation techniques. The aim of this overview is to describe major types of pelvic and urogenital pain syndromes and the neuromodulation approaches that have been trialed, including peripheral nerve stimulation, dorsal root ganglion stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, and brain stimulation techniques. Our conclusion is that neuromodulation, particularly of the peripheral nerves, may provide benefits for patients with pelvic pain. However, larger prospective randomized studies with carefully selected patient groups are required to establish efficacy and determine which patients are likely to achieve the best outcomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: pelvic pain; bladder-pain syndrome; neuromodulation; posterior tibial-nerve stimulation; sacral-nerve stimulation; dorsal-root-ganglion stimulation pelvic pain; bladder-pain syndrome; neuromodulation; posterior tibial-nerve stimulation; sacral-nerve stimulation; dorsal-root-ganglion stimulation
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Roy, H.; Offiah, I.; Dua, A. Neuromodulation for Pelvic and Urogenital Pain. Brain Sci. 2018, 8, 180.

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