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Evaluation and Treatment of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: The Role of Neuropsychology
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A Novel Computer Oculomotor Rehabilitation (COR) Program for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)
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Autonomic Dysfunction after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

1
JFK Johnson Rehabilitation Institute, Edison, NJ 08820, USA
2
JFK Center for Head Injuries, JFK Johnson Rehabilitation Institute, Edison, NJ 08820, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2017, 7(8), 100; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci7080100
Received: 29 June 2017 / Revised: 4 August 2017 / Accepted: 9 August 2017 / Published: 11 August 2017
A mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a complex pathophysiologic process that has a systemic effect on the body aside from solely an impairment in cognitive function. Dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) has been found to induce abnormalities in organ systems throughout the body, and may contribute to cardiovascular dysregulation and increased mortality. Autonomic dysfunction, also known as dysautonomia, has been studied in moderate and severe TBI, and has emerged as a major contributing factor in the symptomatology in mTBI as well. Analysis of the ANS has been studied through changes in heart rate variability (HRV), pupillary dynamics, eye pressure, and arterial pulse wave in those with mild TBI. Graded exercise testing has been studied as both a method of diagnosis and as a means of recovery in those with mild TBI, especially in those with persistent symptoms. Given the studies showing persistence of autonomic dysfunction after symptomatic resolution of concussions, further research is needed to establish return to play protocols. View Full-Text
Keywords: mild traumatic brain injury; mild TBI; concussion; autonomic dysfunction; dysautonomia; heart rate variability; graded exercise testing; post concussive syndrome mild traumatic brain injury; mild TBI; concussion; autonomic dysfunction; dysautonomia; heart rate variability; graded exercise testing; post concussive syndrome
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Esterov, D.; Greenwald, B.D. Autonomic Dysfunction after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. Brain Sci. 2017, 7, 100.

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