Next Article in Journal
Genetic and Pharmacological Manipulations of Glyoxalase 1 Mediate Ethanol Withdrawal Seizure Susceptibility in Mice
Next Article in Special Issue
Disrupted Pallido-Thalamo-Cortical Functional Connectivity in Chronic Disorders of Consciousness
Previous Article in Journal
Physiological and Medico-Social Research Trends of the Wave P300 and More Late Components of Visual Event-Related Potentials
Previous Article in Special Issue
When, How, and to What Extent Are Individuals with Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome Able to Progress? Functional Independence
Article

When, How, and to What Extent Are Individuals with Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome Able to Progress? Neurobehavioral Progress

1
NEURORHB, Servicio de Neurorrehabilitación de Hospitales Vithas, Fundación Vithas, Callosa d’En Sarrià 12, 46007 València, Spain
2
Neurorehabilitation and Brain Research Group, Instituto de Investigación e Innovación en Bioingeniería, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera s/n, 46011 València, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(1), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11010126
Received: 18 November 2020 / Revised: 9 January 2021 / Accepted: 15 January 2021 / Published: 19 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in the Study of Altered State of Consciousness)
Accurate estimation of the neurobehavioral progress of patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS) is essential to anticipate their most likely clinical course and guide clinical decision making. Although different studies have described this progress and possible predictors of neurobehavioral improvement in these patients, they have methodological limitations that could restrict the validity and generalization of the results. This study investigates the neurobehavioral progress of 100 patients with UWS consecutively admitted to a neurorehabilitation center using systematic weekly assessments based on standardized measures, and the prognostic factors of changes in their neurobehavioral condition. Our results showed that, during the analyzed period, 34% of the patients were able to progress from UWS to minimally conscious state (MCS), 12% of the total sample (near one third from those who progressed to MCS) were able to emerge from MCS, and 10% of the patients died. Transition to MCS was mostly denoted by visual signs, which appeared either alone or in combination with motor signs, and was predicted by etiology and the score on the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised at admission with an accuracy of 75%. Emergence from MCS was denoted in the same proportion by functional communication and object use. Predictive models of emergence from MCS and mortality were not valid and the identified predictors could not be accounted for. View Full-Text
Keywords: unresponsive wakefulness syndrome; vegetative state; minimally conscious state; disorders of consciousness; brain damage; predictors; recovery; mortality unresponsive wakefulness syndrome; vegetative state; minimally conscious state; disorders of consciousness; brain damage; predictors; recovery; mortality
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Noé, E.; Ferri, J.; Olaya, J.; Navarro, M.D.; O’Valle, M.; Colomer, C.; Moliner, B.; Ippoliti, C.; Maza, A.; Llorens, R. When, How, and to What Extent Are Individuals with Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome Able to Progress? Neurobehavioral Progress. Brain Sci. 2021, 11, 126. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11010126

AMA Style

Noé E, Ferri J, Olaya J, Navarro MD, O’Valle M, Colomer C, Moliner B, Ippoliti C, Maza A, Llorens R. When, How, and to What Extent Are Individuals with Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome Able to Progress? Neurobehavioral Progress. Brain Sciences. 2021; 11(1):126. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11010126

Chicago/Turabian Style

Noé, Enrique, Joan Ferri, José Olaya, María D. Navarro, Myrtha O’Valle, Carolina Colomer, Belén Moliner, Camilla Ippoliti, Anny Maza, and Roberto Llorens. 2021. "When, How, and to What Extent Are Individuals with Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome Able to Progress? Neurobehavioral Progress" Brain Sciences 11, no. 1: 126. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11010126

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop