Next Article in Journal
Transfer Learning with Deep Recurrent Neural Networks for Remaining Useful Life Estimation
Previous Article in Journal
Investigation of Electromagnetic Angle Sensor Integrated in FR4-Based Scanning Micromirror
Previous Article in Special Issue
Lanthanum-Containing Magnesium Alloy with Antitumor Function Based on Increased Reactive Oxygen Species
Article Menu
Issue 12 (December) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(12), 2414; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8122414

3D Bioprinting Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Tissues Using a Novel Lab-on-a-Printer Technology

1
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria, BC V8P 5C2, Canada
2
School of Engineering and Sciences, Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education, Mexico City 14380, Mexico
3
Biomedical Engineering Program, University of Victoria, BC V8P 5C2, Canada
4
Center of Mathematics, Computing and Cognition, Federal University of ABC, São Paulo 09606-045, Brazil
5
Division of Medical Sciences, University of Victoria, BC V8P 5C2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 October 2018 / Revised: 16 November 2018 / Accepted: 23 November 2018 / Published: 28 November 2018
Full-Text   |   PDF [4771 KB, uploaded 28 November 2018]   |  

Abstract

Most neurological diseases and disorders lack true cures, including spinal cord injury (SCI). Accordingly, current treatments only alleviate the symptoms of these neurological diseases and disorders. Engineered neural tissues derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can serve as powerful tools to identify drug targets for treating such diseases and disorders. In this work, we demonstrate how hiPSC-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs) can be bioprinted into defined structures using Aspect Biosystems’ novel RX1 bioprinter in combination with our unique fibrin-based bioink in rapid fashion as it takes under 5 min to print four tissues. This printing process preserves high levels of cell viability (>81%) and their differentiation capacity in comparison to less sophisticated bioprinting methods. These bioprinted neural tissues expressed the neuronal marker, βT-III (45 ± 20.9%), after 15 days of culture and markers associated with spinal cord (SC) motor neurons (MNs), such as Olig2 (68.8 ± 6.9%), and HB9 (99.6 ± 0.4%) as indicated by flow cytometry. The bioprinted neural tissues expressed the mature MN marker, ChaT, after 30 days of culture as indicated by immunocytochemistry. In conclusion, we have presented a novel method for high throughput production of mature hiPSC-derived neural tissues with defined structures that resemble those found in the SC. View Full-Text
Keywords: 3D bioprinting; neural tissue; motor neurons; pluripotent stem cells; biomaterials; spinal cord injury; lab on a printer; fibrin 3D bioprinting; neural tissue; motor neurons; pluripotent stem cells; biomaterials; spinal cord injury; lab on a printer; fibrin
Figures

Graphical abstract

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

De la Vega, L.; A. Rosas Gómez, D.; Abelseth, E.; Abelseth, L.; Allisson da Silva, V.; Willerth, S.M. 3D Bioprinting Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Tissues Using a Novel Lab-on-a-Printer Technology. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 2414.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Appl. Sci. EISSN 2076-3417 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top