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Article

Towards a More Accessible Cultural Heritage: Challenges and Opportunities in Contextualisation Using 3D Sound Narratives

by 1,*,†, 2,† and 1,*
1
Dyson School of Design Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2DB, UK
2
Department of Architecture and Design, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino, Italy
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: Marek Milosz
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(8), 3336; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11083336
Received: 6 March 2021 / Revised: 29 March 2021 / Accepted: 31 March 2021 / Published: 8 April 2021
This paper reports on the exploration of potential design opportunities for social media and technology to identify issues and challenges in involving people in generating content within a cultural heritage context. The work is divided into two parts. In the first part, arguments are informed by findings from 22 in-depth semi-structured interviews with representatives of cultural institutions and with people from a general audience who recently participated in a cultural activity. The key findings show that social media could be used more extensively to achieve a deeper understanding of cultural diversity, with opportunities in redefining the expert, extending the experience space, and decentralising collaboration. To further support these findings, a case study was set up evaluating the experience of a mini audio tour with user-generated (i.e., personal stories from a local audience) vs. non user-generated (i.e., professional stories including facts) narratives. These were delivered using text and 3D sound on a mobile device. The narratives were related to a built environment in central London near world-renown museums, cultural buildings, and a royal park. Observations, a standardised spatial presence questionnaire, and a short open interview at the end of the tour were used to gain insights about participants preferences and overall experience. Thematic analysis and triangulation were used as a means for understanding and articulating opportunities for social media to better involve and engage people using user-generated narratives presented through 3D sound. View Full-Text
Keywords: cultural heritage; sound and narrative design; built environment; user-generated content cultural heritage; sound and narrative design; built environment; user-generated content
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lim, V.; Khan, S.; Picinali, L. Towards a More Accessible Cultural Heritage: Challenges and Opportunities in Contextualisation Using 3D Sound Narratives. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 3336. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11083336

AMA Style

Lim V, Khan S, Picinali L. Towards a More Accessible Cultural Heritage: Challenges and Opportunities in Contextualisation Using 3D Sound Narratives. Applied Sciences. 2021; 11(8):3336. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11083336

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lim, Veranika, Sara Khan, and Lorenzo Picinali. 2021. "Towards a More Accessible Cultural Heritage: Challenges and Opportunities in Contextualisation Using 3D Sound Narratives" Applied Sciences 11, no. 8: 3336. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11083336

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