Next Article in Journal
Promiscuous Targets for Antitubercular Drug Discovery: The Paradigm of DprE1 and MmpL3
Next Article in Special Issue
Carbon Dioxide Uptake by Mortars and Concretes Made with Portuguese Cements
Previous Article in Journal
Enhancing Multi-tissue and Multi-scale Cell Nuclei Segmentation with Deep Metric Learning
Previous Article in Special Issue
Carbon Dioxide Uptake by Cement-Based Materials: A Spanish Case Study
Open AccessArticle

An Integrated Approach to Determining the Capacity of Ecosystems to Supply Ecosystem Services into Life Cycle Assessment for a Carbon Capture System

1
Academic Department, College of Puebla., Av. 41, Gabriel Pastor First Section, Puebla 72420, Pue., Mexico
2
Bioenergy Laboratory, Institute for Ecosystem and Sustainability Research, UNAM, Campus Morelia Antigua Carretera a Pátzcuaro No. 8701 Col. Ex Hacienda de San José de la Huerta, Morelia 58190, Michoacán, Mexico
3
The Nature Conservancy-Mexico, Ricardo Palmerín 110, Colonia Guadalupe Inn, Alcaldía Álvaro Obregón 01020, CDMX, Mexico
4
Basic Science Department, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Av. San Pablo 180, Azcapotzalco 02200, CDMX, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(2), 622; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10020622
Received: 15 December 2019 / Revised: 11 January 2020 / Accepted: 13 January 2020 / Published: 15 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Capture and Utilization)
In the life cycle assessment (LCA) method, it is not possible to carry out an integrated sustainability analysis because the quantification of the biophysical capacity of the ecosystems to supply ecosystem services is not taken into account. This paper considers a methodological proposal connecting the flow demand of a process or system product from the technosphere and the feasibility of the ecosystem to supply based on the sink capacity. The ecosystem metabolism as an analytical framework and data from a case study of an LCA of combined heat and power (CHP) plant with and without post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) technology in Mexico were applied. Three scenarios, including water and energy depletion and climate change impact, are presented to show the types of results obtained when the process effect of operation is scaled to one year. The impact of the water–energy–carbon nexus over the natural infrastructure or ecological fund in LCA is analyzed. Further, the feasibility of the biomass energy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) from this result for Mexico is discussed. On the supply side, in the three different scenarios, the CHP plant requires between 323.4 and 516 ha to supply the required oil as stock flow and 46–134 ha to supply the required freshwater. On the sink side, 52–5,096,511 ha is necessary to sequester the total CO2 emissions. Overall, the CHP plant generates 1.9–28.8 MW/ha of electricity to fulfill its function. The CHP with PCC is the option with fewer ecosystem services required. View Full-Text
Keywords: carbon sequestration; ecological funds; post-combustion carbon capture; ecological fund; ecosystems metabolisms; flow; sink capacity carbon sequestration; ecological funds; post-combustion carbon capture; ecological fund; ecosystems metabolisms; flow; sink capacity
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Morales Mora, M.A.; Martínez Bravo, R.D.; Farell Baril, C.; Fuentes Hernández, M.; Martínez Delgadillo, S.A. An Integrated Approach to Determining the Capacity of Ecosystems to Supply Ecosystem Services into Life Cycle Assessment for a Carbon Capture System. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 622.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop