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Microtopography Controls of Carbon and Related Elements Distribution in the West Siberian Frozen Bogs

1
BIO-GEO-CLIM Laboratory, National Research Tomsk State University, Lenina St. 36, 634050 Tomsk, Russia
2
Geoscience and Environment Toulouse, UMR 5563 CNRS, University of Toulouse, 14 Ave Edouard Belin 31400 Toulouse, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Geosciences 2019, 9(7), 291; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9070291
Received: 31 May 2019 / Revised: 24 June 2019 / Accepted: 28 June 2019 / Published: 30 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Properties, Developments and Processes of Soils as Carbon Sinks)
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Abstract

The West Siberian Plain stands out among other boreal plains by phenomenal bogging, which has both global and regional significance. The polygonal bogs, frozen raised-mound bogs, and ombrotrophic ridge-hollow raised bogs are the most extensive bog types in the study area. These bogs commonly show highly diverse surface patterns consisting of mounds, polygons, ridges, hollows, and fens that correspond to the microtopes. Here we investigated how the microtopographic features of the landscape affect the thermal and hydrologic conditions of the soil as well as the nutrient availability and consequently, the dynamics of carbon and related elements. The effect of the surface heterogeneity on the temperature regimes and depths of permafrost is most significant. All of these factors together are reflected, through the feedback system, by a number of hydrochemical parameters of bog waters, such as dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (DOC, DIC), specific conductivity (Cond), SO42–, Cl, P, Sr, Al, Ti, Cu, V, B, Cs, Cd, Rb, As, U, and rare earth elements (REEs). Among the studied parameters, DOC, SO42–, Al, V, and Mn differ most significantly between the convex and concave microforms. The DOC content in bog water is significantly affected by the water residence time, which is significantly longer in soils of mound/polygons than fens. Plants biomass is higher on the mounds which also have some effect that, due to leaching, should lead to more carbon entering into the water of the mounds. It is also shown that atmospheric-dust particles have a noticeable effect on the hydrochemical parameters of bog waters, especially on mounds. The ongoing climate warming will lead to an increase in the fens area and to a decrease in the content of DOC and many elements in bog waters. View Full-Text
Keywords: frozen bogs; ombrotrophic ridge-hollow raised bogs; surface bog patterning; bog water; Histosols; Western Siberia Lowland (WSL) frozen bogs; ombrotrophic ridge-hollow raised bogs; surface bog patterning; bog water; Histosols; Western Siberia Lowland (WSL)
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Loiko, S.; Raudina, T.; Lim, A.; Kuzmina, D.; Kulizhskiy, S.; Pokrovsky, O. Microtopography Controls of Carbon and Related Elements Distribution in the West Siberian Frozen Bogs. Geosciences 2019, 9, 291.

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