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Thermal Effects of Magmatism on Surrounding Sediments and Petroleum Systems in the Northern Offshore Taranaki Basin, New Zealand

1
Institute of Geology and Geochemistry of Petroleum and Coal, RWTH Aachen University, 52062–52080 Aachen, Germany
2
Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences, 5010 Lower Hutt, New Zealand
3
Energy and Mineral Resources Group, Geological Institute, RWTH Aachen University, 52062–52080 Aachen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Geosciences 2019, 9(7), 288; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9070288
Received: 8 May 2019 / Revised: 24 June 2019 / Accepted: 26 June 2019 / Published: 29 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geostatistical Applications in Petroleum Geology)
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Abstract

In the past two decades, numerical forward modeling of petroleum systems has been extensively used in exploration geology. However, modeling of petroleum systems influenced by magmatic activity has not been a common practice, because it is often associated with additional uncertainties and thus is a high risk associated with exploration. Subsurface processes associated with volcanic activity extensively influence all the elements of petroleum systems and may have positive and negative effects on hydrocarbon formation and accumulation. This study integrates 3D seismic data, geochemical and well data to build detailed 1D and 3D models of the Kora Volcano—a buried Miocene arc volcano in the northern Taranaki Basin, New Zealand. It examines the impact of magmatism on the source rock maturation and burial history in the northern Taranaki Basin. The Kora field contains a sub-commercial oil accumulation in volcanoclastic rocks that has been encountered by a well drilled on the flank of the volcano. By comparing the results of distinct models, we concluded that magmatic activity had a local effect on the thermal regime in the study area and resulted in rapid thermal maturation of the surrounding organic matter-rich sediments. Scenarios of the magmatic activity age (18, 11 and 8 Ma) show that the re-equilibration of the temperature after intrusion takes longer (up to 5 Ma) in the scenarios with a younger emplacement age (8 Ma) due to an added insulation effect of the thicker overburden. Results of the modeling also suggest that most hydrocarbons expelled from the source rock during this magmatic event escaped to the surface due to the absence of a proper seal rock at that time. View Full-Text
Keywords: Taranaki Basin; petroleum system modeling; magmatism; Kora volcano; vitrinite reflectance; seismic interpretation Taranaki Basin; petroleum system modeling; magmatism; Kora volcano; vitrinite reflectance; seismic interpretation
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Kutovaya, A.; Kroeger, K.F.; Seebeck, H.; Back, S.; Littke, R. Thermal Effects of Magmatism on Surrounding Sediments and Petroleum Systems in the Northern Offshore Taranaki Basin, New Zealand. Geosciences 2019, 9, 288.

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