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Composition Changes of Hydrocarbons during Secondary Petroleum Migration (Case Study in Cooper Basin, Australia)

Australian School of Petroleum, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia
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Geosciences 2019, 9(2), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9020078
Received: 28 November 2018 / Revised: 15 January 2019 / Accepted: 30 January 2019 / Published: 3 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stress Quantification in Sedimentary Basins)
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Abstract

The reliable mathematical modelling of secondary petroleum migration that incorporates structural geology and mature source rocks in the basin model, allows for prediction of the reservoir location, yielding the significant enhancement of the probability of exploration success. We investigate secondary petroleum migration with a significant composition difference between the source and oil pools. In our case study, the secondary migration period is significantly shorter than the time of the hydrocarbon pulse generation. Therefore, neither adsorption nor dispersion of components can explain the concentration difference between the source rock and the reservoir. For the first time, the present paper proposes deep bed filtration of hydrocarbons with component kinetics retention by the rock as a physics mechanism explaining compositional grading. Introduction of the component capture rate into mass balance transport equation facilitates matching the concentration difference for heavy hydrocarbons, and the tuned filtration coefficients vary in their common range. The obtained values of filtration coefficients monotonically increase with molecular weight and consequently affects the size of the oleic component, as predicted by the analytical model of deep bed filtration. The modelling shows a negligible effect of component dispersion on the compositional grading. View Full-Text
Keywords: secondary migration; sedimentary basin; composition gradient; stress-dependent permeability; deep-bed filtration; mathematical model secondary migration; sedimentary basin; composition gradient; stress-dependent permeability; deep-bed filtration; mathematical model
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Borazjani, S.; Kulikowski, D.; Amrouch, K.; Bedrikovetsky, P. Composition Changes of Hydrocarbons during Secondary Petroleum Migration (Case Study in Cooper Basin, Australia). Geosciences 2019, 9, 78.

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