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Open AccessArticle

Field Survey of 2018 Typhoon Jebi in Japan: Lessons for Disaster Risk Management

1
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555, Japan
2
Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Geosciences 2018, 8(11), 412; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8110412
Received: 10 October 2018 / Revised: 6 November 2018 / Accepted: 7 November 2018 / Published: 9 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue River, Urban, and Coastal Flood Risk)
Typhoon Jebi struck Japan on the 4 September 2018, damaging and inundating many coastal areas along Osaka Bay due to the high winds, a storm surge, and wind driven waves. In order to understand the various damage mechanisms, the authors conducted a field survey two days after the typhoon made landfall, measuring inundation heights and depths at several locations in Hyogo Prefecture. The survey results showed that 0.18–1.27 m inundation depths were caused by Typhoon Jebi. As parts of the survey, local residents were interviewed about the flooding, and a questionnaire survey regarding awareness of typhoons and storm surges, and their response to the typhoon was distributed. The authors also mapped the location of some of the containers that were displaced by the storm surge, aiming to provide information to validate future simulation models of container displacement. Finally, some interesting characteristics of the storm surge are summarized, such as possible overtopping at what had initially been thought to be a low risk area (Suzukaze town), and lessons learnt in terms of disaster risk management are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: Typhoon Jebi; damage patterns; storm surge; Japan; field survey; container movement Typhoon Jebi; damage patterns; storm surge; Japan; field survey; container movement
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MDPI and ACS Style

Takabatake, T.; Mäll, M.; Esteban, M.; Nakamura, R.; Kyaw, T.O.; Ishii, H.; Valdez, J.J.; Nishida, Y.; Noya, F.; Shibayama, T. Field Survey of 2018 Typhoon Jebi in Japan: Lessons for Disaster Risk Management. Geosciences 2018, 8, 412. https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8110412

AMA Style

Takabatake T, Mäll M, Esteban M, Nakamura R, Kyaw TO, Ishii H, Valdez JJ, Nishida Y, Noya F, Shibayama T. Field Survey of 2018 Typhoon Jebi in Japan: Lessons for Disaster Risk Management. Geosciences. 2018; 8(11):412. https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8110412

Chicago/Turabian Style

Takabatake, Tomoyuki; Mäll, Martin; Esteban, Miguel; Nakamura, Ryota; Kyaw, Thit O.; Ishii, Hidenori; Valdez, Justin J.; Nishida, Yuta; Noya, Fuma; Shibayama, Tomoya. 2018. "Field Survey of 2018 Typhoon Jebi in Japan: Lessons for Disaster Risk Management" Geosciences 8, no. 11: 412. https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8110412

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