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Geodynamic Reconstructions of the Australides—1: Palaeozoic
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Geodynamic Reconstructions of the Australides—2: Mesozoic–Cainozoic

Institute of Earth Science, University of Lausanne, Géopolis, Quartier Mouline, Lausanne CH–1015, Switzerland
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Geosciences 2013, 3(2), 331-353; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences3020331
Received: 23 March 2013 / Revised: 29 April 2013 / Accepted: 13 May 2013 / Published: 4 June 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedimentary Basins and Orogenic Belts)
The present work, derived from a full global geodynamic reconstruction model over 600 Ma and based on a large database, focuses herein on the interaction between the Pacific, Australian and Antarctic plates since 200 Ma, and proposes integrated solutions for a coherent, physically consistent scenario. The evolution of the Australia–Antarctica–West Pacific plate system is dependent on the Gondwana fit chosen for the reconstruction. Our fit, as defined for the latest Triassic, implies an original scenario for the evolution of the region, in particular for the “early” opening history of the Tasman Sea. The interaction with the Pacific, moreover, is characterised by many magmatic arc migrations and ocean openings, which are stopped by arc–arc collision, arc–spreading axis collision, or arc–oceanic plateau collision, and subduction reversals. Mid-Pacific oceanic plateaus created in the model are much wider than they are on present-day maps, and although they were subducted to a large extent, they were able to stop subduction. We also suggest that adduction processes (i.e., re-emergence of subducted material) may have played an important role, in particular along the plate limit now represented by the Alpine Fault in New Zealand. View Full-Text
Keywords: Australia; Antarctica; Tasmania; New Zealand; Lord Howe Rise; Tasman Sea; west Pacific; plate tectonics; geodynamic reconstructions Australia; Antarctica; Tasmania; New Zealand; Lord Howe Rise; Tasman Sea; west Pacific; plate tectonics; geodynamic reconstructions
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Vérard, C.; Stampfli, G.M. Geodynamic Reconstructions of the Australides—2: Mesozoic–Cainozoic. Geosciences 2013, 3, 331-353.

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