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Addressing Lameness in Farmed Animals: An Urgent Need to Achieve Compliance with EU Animal Welfare Law

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Eurogroup for Animals, rue Ducale 29, 1000 Brussels, Belgium
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Compassion in World Farming, River Court, Mill Lane, Godalming, Surrey GU7 1EZ, UK
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Animals 2019, 9(8), 576; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9080576
Received: 28 June 2019 / Accepted: 15 August 2019 / Published: 19 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lameness in Livestock)
In this short paper we explain the reasons why preventing and treating lameness in farmed animals can and should be considered a legal requirement under European Union (EU) animal welfare law. We also briefly present the situation in different farming sectors. We make the case that, in order to comply with current EU farmed animal welfare law, lameness prevalence and severity should be regularly monitored on farm, and species-specific alarm thresholds should be used to trigger corrective actions.
Lameness is the clinical manifestation of a range of painful locomotory conditions affecting many species of farmed animals. Although these conditions have serious consequences for animal welfare, productivity, and longevity, the prevention and treatment of lameness continue to receive insufficient attention in most farming sectors across the European Union (EU). In this paper, we outline the legislative framework that regulates the handling of lameness and other painful conditions in farmed animals in the EU. We briefly outline the current situation in different livestock farming sectors. Finally, we make the case for the introduction of regular on-farm monitoring of lameness and for the setting of alarm thresholds that should trigger corrective actions. View Full-Text
Keywords: pain; animal welfare; cattle; pigs; chickens; sheep; goats; policy; legislation; European Union pain; animal welfare; cattle; pigs; chickens; sheep; goats; policy; legislation; European Union
MDPI and ACS Style

Nalon, E.; Stevenson, P. Addressing Lameness in Farmed Animals: An Urgent Need to Achieve Compliance with EU Animal Welfare Law. Animals 2019, 9, 576. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9080576

AMA Style

Nalon E, Stevenson P. Addressing Lameness in Farmed Animals: An Urgent Need to Achieve Compliance with EU Animal Welfare Law. Animals. 2019; 9(8):576. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9080576

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nalon, Elena, and Peter Stevenson. 2019. "Addressing Lameness in Farmed Animals: An Urgent Need to Achieve Compliance with EU Animal Welfare Law" Animals 9, no. 8: 576. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9080576

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