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Article

The Concurrent Detection of Chelonid Alphaherpesvirus 5 and Chelonia mydas Papillomavirus 1 in Tumoured and Non-Tumoured Green Turtles

1
College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4814, Australia
2
College of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4814, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editors: Annie Page-Karjian and Justin Perrault
Animals 2021, 11(3), 697; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11030697
Received: 8 February 2021 / Revised: 1 March 2021 / Accepted: 1 March 2021 / Published: 5 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oncogenic Viruses in Animals)
Characterised by benign tumours, fibropapillomatosis is a debilitating disease that predominantly afflicts the endangered green turtle (Chelonia mydas). A growing body of evidence has associated these tumours with a herpesvirus. However, a recent study detected both herpesvirus and papillomavirus in these tumours. This result challenged the idea that the herpesvirus is the sole virus associated with this disease. The present study aimed to better understand the co-occurrence of these viruses in turtles with fibropapillomatosis (in both tumour samples and non-tumoured skin samples), in addition to samples from non-tumoured turtles. Both viruses were detected in all sample types, with the 43.5% of tumours containing both herpesvirus and papillomavirus. Tumour samples were found to contain the most herpesvirus while the highest amount of papillomavirus was detected in non-tumoured skin from turtles with tumours. Collectively, these results pivot the way we think about this disease; as an infectious disease where two separate viruses may be at play.
Characterised by benign tumours, fibropapillomatosis (FP) is a debilitating disease that predominantly afflicts the endangered green turtle (Chelonia mydas). A growing body of histological and molecular evidence has associated FP tumours with Chelonid alphaherpesvirus 5 (ChHV5). However, a recent study which detected both ChHV5 and Chelonia mydas papillomavirus 1 (CmPV1) DNA in FP tumour tissues has challenged this hypothesis. The present study aimed to establish a probe-based qPCR to assess the wider prevalence of CmPV1 and co-occurrence with ChHV5 in 275 marine turtles foraging in waters adjacent to the east coast of Queensland, Australia: three categories: Group A (FP tumours), Group B (non-tumoured skin from FP turtles) and Group C (non-tumoured skin from turtles without FP). Concurrent detection of ChHV5 and CmPV1 DNA is reported for all three categories, where Group A had the highest rate (43.5%). ChHV5 viral loads in Group A were significantly higher than loads seen in Group B and C. This was not the case for CmPV1 where the loads in Group B were highest, followed by Group A. However, the mean CmPV1 load for Group A samples was not significantly different to the mean load reported from Group B or C samples. Collectively, these results pivot the way we think about FP; as an infectious disease where two separate viruses may be at play. View Full-Text
Keywords: marine turtles; tumour; fibropapillomatosis; Chelonid alphaherpesvirus 5; Chelonia mydas papillomavirus 1 marine turtles; tumour; fibropapillomatosis; Chelonid alphaherpesvirus 5; Chelonia mydas papillomavirus 1
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mashkour, N.; Jones, K.; Wirth, W.; Burgess, G.; Ariel, E. The Concurrent Detection of Chelonid Alphaherpesvirus 5 and Chelonia mydas Papillomavirus 1 in Tumoured and Non-Tumoured Green Turtles. Animals 2021, 11, 697. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11030697

AMA Style

Mashkour N, Jones K, Wirth W, Burgess G, Ariel E. The Concurrent Detection of Chelonid Alphaherpesvirus 5 and Chelonia mydas Papillomavirus 1 in Tumoured and Non-Tumoured Green Turtles. Animals. 2021; 11(3):697. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11030697

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mashkour, Narges, Karina Jones, Wytamma Wirth, Graham Burgess, and Ellen Ariel. 2021. "The Concurrent Detection of Chelonid Alphaherpesvirus 5 and Chelonia mydas Papillomavirus 1 in Tumoured and Non-Tumoured Green Turtles" Animals 11, no. 3: 697. https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11030697

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