Next Article in Journal
Methodical Considerations and Resistance Evaluation against Fusarium graminearum and F. culmorum Head Blight in Wheat. Part 3. Susceptibility Window and Resistance Expression
Previous Article in Journal
Antimicrobial Peptides from Rat-Tailed Maggots of the Drone Fly Eristalis tenax Show Potent Activity against Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria
Open AccessArticle

Inhibition of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines by Metabolites of Streptomycetes—A Potential Alternative to Current Anti-Inflammatory Drugs?

1
Institute of Immunology and Microbiology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, 116 36 Prague, Czech Republic
2
Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic
3
Institute of Soil Biology, Biology Centre Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2020, 8(5), 621; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8050621
Received: 30 March 2020 / Revised: 22 April 2020 / Accepted: 23 April 2020 / Published: 25 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Microbial Biotechnology)
Current treatment of chronic diseases includes, among others, application of cytokines, monoclonal antibodies, cellular therapies, and immunostimulants. As all the underlying mechanisms of a particular diseases are not always fully clarified, treatment can be inefficient and associated with various, sometimes serious, side effects. Small secondary metabolites produced by various microbes represent an attractive alternative as future anti-inflammatory drug leads. Compared to current drugs, they are cheaper, can often be administered orally, but still can keep a high target-specificity. Some compounds produced by actinomycetes or fungi have already been used as immunomodulators—tacrolimus, sirolimus, and cyclosporine. This work documents strong anti-inflammatory features of another secondary metabolite of streptomycetes—manumycin-type polyketides. We compared the effect of four related compounds: manumycin A, manumycin B, asukamycin, and colabomycin E on activation and survival of human monocyte/macrophage cell line THP-1. The anti-cancer effect of manucycine A has been demonstrated; the immunomodulatory capacities of manumycin A are obvious when using micromolar concentrations. The application of all four compounds in 0.25–5 μM concentrations leads to efficient, concentration-dependent inhibition of IL-1β and TNF expression in THP-1 upon LPS stimulation, while the three latter compounds show a significantly lower pro-apoptotic effect than manumycin A. We have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory capacity of selected manumycin-type polyketides. View Full-Text
Keywords: Streptomyces; secondary metabolites; manumycins; immunomodulation; inflammation Streptomyces; secondary metabolites; manumycins; immunomodulation; inflammation
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Hrdý, J.; Súkeníková, L.; Petrásková, P.; Novotná, O.; Kahoun, D.; Petříček, M.; Chroňáková, A.; Petříčková, K. Inhibition of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines by Metabolites of Streptomycetes—A Potential Alternative to Current Anti-Inflammatory Drugs? Microorganisms 2020, 8, 621.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop