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Open AccessReview

Current Status and Future Strategies to Increase Secondary Metabolite Production from Cyanobacteria

1
Department of Biological Sciences and KAIST Institutes for the BioCentury, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 34141, Korea
2
Institute of Pharmaceutical Research, College of Pharmacy, Gachon University, Incheon 21999, Korea
3
College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 06911, Korea
4
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 34134, Korea
5
Department of Biological Engineering, Inha University, Incheon 22212, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2020, 8(12), 1849; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8121849
Received: 29 October 2020 / Revised: 15 November 2020 / Accepted: 23 November 2020 / Published: 24 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Secondary Metabolites and Biotechnology)
Cyanobacteria, given their ability to produce various secondary metabolites utilizing solar energy and carbon dioxide, are a potential platform for sustainable production of biochemicals. Until now, conventional metabolic engineering approaches have been applied to various cyanobacterial species for enhanced production of industrially valued compounds, including secondary metabolites and non-natural biochemicals. However, the shortage of understanding of cyanobacterial metabolic and regulatory networks for atmospheric carbon fixation to biochemical production and the lack of available engineering tools limit the potential of cyanobacteria for industrial applications. Recently, to overcome the limitations, synthetic biology tools and systems biology approaches such as genome-scale modeling based on diverse omics data have been applied to cyanobacteria. This review covers the synthetic and systems biology approaches for advanced metabolic engineering of cyanobacteria. View Full-Text
Keywords: cyanobacteria; photosynthesis; secondary metabolites; metabolic engineering; synthetic biology; systems biology; genome-scale model cyanobacteria; photosynthesis; secondary metabolites; metabolic engineering; synthetic biology; systems biology; genome-scale model
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jeong, Y.; Cho, S.-H.; Lee, H.; Choi, H.-K.; Kim, D.-M.; Lee, C.-G.; Cho, S.; Cho, B.-K. Current Status and Future Strategies to Increase Secondary Metabolite Production from Cyanobacteria. Microorganisms 2020, 8, 1849. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8121849

AMA Style

Jeong Y, Cho S-H, Lee H, Choi H-K, Kim D-M, Lee C-G, Cho S, Cho B-K. Current Status and Future Strategies to Increase Secondary Metabolite Production from Cyanobacteria. Microorganisms. 2020; 8(12):1849. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8121849

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jeong, Yujin; Cho, Sang-Hyeok; Lee, Hookeun; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon; Kim, Dong-Myung; Lee, Choul-Gyun; Cho, Suhyung; Cho, Byung-Kwan. 2020. "Current Status and Future Strategies to Increase Secondary Metabolite Production from Cyanobacteria" Microorganisms 8, no. 12: 1849. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8121849

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