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Open AccessArticle

Entomological Surveillance for Zika and Dengue Virus in Aedes Mosquitoes: Implications for Vector Control in Thailand

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand
2
Department of Entomology, Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences (AFRIMS), Bangkok 10400, Thailand
3
Department of Chemistry and Life Science, United States Military Academy West Point, West Point, NY 10996, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pathogens 2020, 9(6), 442; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9060442
Received: 15 May 2020 / Revised: 2 June 2020 / Accepted: 3 June 2020 / Published: 4 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Untargeted Alternative Routes of Arbovirus Transmission)
Entomological surveillance for arthropod-borne viruses is vital for monitoring vector-borne diseases and informing vector control programs. In this study, we conducted entomological surveillance in Zika virus endemic areas. In Thailand, it is standard protocol to perform mosquito control within 24 h of a reported dengue case. Aedes females were collected within 72 h of case reports from villages with recent Zika–human cases in Kamphaeng Phet Province, Thailand in 2017 and 2018. Mosquitoes were bisected into head-thorax and abdomen and then screened for Zika (ZIKV) and dengue (DENV) viruses using real-time RT-PCR. ZIKV RNA was detected in three samples from two female Ae. aegypti (1.4%). A partial envelope sequence analysis revealed that the ZIKV sequences were the Asian lineage identical to sequences from ZIKV-infected cases reported in Thailand during 2016 and 2017. Dengue virus-1 (DENV-1) and dengue virus-4 (DENV-4) were found in four Ae. aegypti females (2.8%), and partial capsid sequences were nearly identical with DENV-1 and DENV-4 from Thai human cases reported in 2017. Findings in the current study demonstrate the importance of entomological surveillance programs to public health mosquito-borne disease prevention measures and control. View Full-Text
Keywords: zika virus; dengue virus; Aedes aegypti; mosquito surveillance; Thailand zika virus; dengue virus; Aedes aegypti; mosquito surveillance; Thailand
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Kosoltanapiwat, N.; Tongshoob, J.; Singkhaimuk, P.; Nitatsukprasert, C.; Davidson, S.A.; Ponlawat, A. Entomological Surveillance for Zika and Dengue Virus in Aedes Mosquitoes: Implications for Vector Control in Thailand. Pathogens 2020, 9, 442.

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