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Article

Post-Dictatorship Documentary in Chile: Conversations with Three Second-Generation Film Directors

School of Media, Creative Arts and Social Inquiry, Curtin University, Bentley 6102, Australia
Humanities 2018, 7(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/h7010008
Received: 28 November 2017 / Revised: 6 January 2018 / Accepted: 9 January 2018 / Published: 14 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wounded: Studies in Literary and Cinematic Trauma)
No other medium has rejected the restorative narrative of Chile’s democratic state’s memory discourse as vigorously as documentary cinema. After the several democratic governments that succeeded the civic-military dictatorial alliance that ruled this nation uninterruptedly between 1973 and 1990, documentary films have resisted monumental versions of historical memory by confronting the ambivalent nuances of the traumatic legacy of the dictatorship. Chilean documentarians have investigated, uncovered, and depicted the dictatorial state’s crimes, while offering testimonial space to survivors, and have also interrogated the perspectives of the dictatorship’s supporters, collaborators, and perpetrators while wrestling with an open dialectic of confrontational and reconciliatory gestures. More recently, this interest has intensified and combined with what is often described as a “boom” in second-generation personal-narration memory films. The present article includes the author’s conversations with the directors of three recent Chilean second-generation documentaries that explore the perspectives of former secret service collaborators: Adrian Goycoolea’s ¡Viva Chile Mierda! [Long Live Chile, Damn It!] (2014), Andrés Lübbert’s El color del camaleón [The Color of the Chameleon] (2017), and Lissette Orozco’s El pacto de Adriana [Adriana’s Pact] (2017). View Full-Text
Keywords: documentary; Chile; dictatorship; Pinochet; torture; trauma; memory; perpetrators; post-conflict; reconciliation documentary; Chile; dictatorship; Pinochet; torture; trauma; memory; perpetrators; post-conflict; reconciliation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Traverso, A. Post-Dictatorship Documentary in Chile: Conversations with Three Second-Generation Film Directors. Humanities 2018, 7, 8. https://doi.org/10.3390/h7010008

AMA Style

Traverso A. Post-Dictatorship Documentary in Chile: Conversations with Three Second-Generation Film Directors. Humanities. 2018; 7(1):8. https://doi.org/10.3390/h7010008

Chicago/Turabian Style

Traverso, Antonio. 2018. "Post-Dictatorship Documentary in Chile: Conversations with Three Second-Generation Film Directors" Humanities 7, no. 1: 8. https://doi.org/10.3390/h7010008

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