Next Article in Journal
Outdoor Thermal Comfort: Coupling Microclimatic Parameters with Subjective Thermal Assessment to Design Urban Performative Spaces
Previous Article in Journal
Improving the Accuracy of a Hygrothermal Model for Wood-Frame Walls: A Cold-Climate Study
Open AccessArticle

Alternative Method to the Replication of Wind Effects into the Buildings Thermal Simulation

1
Department of Energy Engineering, School of Natural Resources, German Jordanian University, P.O. Box 35247, Amman 11180, Jordan
2
Priority Research Centre, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Buildings 2020, 10(12), 237; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10120237
Received: 12 November 2020 / Revised: 2 December 2020 / Accepted: 8 December 2020 / Published: 11 December 2020
To design energy-efficient buildings, energy assessment programs need to be developed for determining the inside air temperature, so that thermal comfort of the occupant can be sustained. The internal temperatures could be calculated through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis; however, miniscule time steps (seconds and milliseconds) are used by a long-term simulation (i.e., weeks, months) that require excessive time for computing wind effects results even for high-performance personal computers. This paper examines a new method, wherein the wind effect surrounding the buildings is integrated with the external air temperature to facilitate wind simulation in building analysis over long periods. This was done with the help of an equivalent temperature (known as Tnatural), where the convection heat loss is produced in an equal capacity by this air temperature and by the built-in wind effects. Subsequently, this new external air temperature Tnatural can be used to calculate the internal air temperature. Upon inclusion of wind effects, above 90% of the results were found to be within 0–3 °C of the perceived temperatures compared to the real data (99% for insulated cavity brick (InsCB), 91% for cavity brick (CB), 93% for insulated reverse brick veneer (InsRBV) and 94% for insulated brick veneer (InsBV) modules). However, a decline of 83–88% was observed in the results after ignoring the wind effects. Hence, the presence of wind effects holds greater importance in correct simulation of the thermal performance of the modules. Moreover, the simulation time will expectedly reduce to below 1% of the original simulation time. View Full-Text
Keywords: building simulation; Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD); wind effect; building thermal performance; low-energy buildings building simulation; Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD); wind effect; building thermal performance; low-energy buildings
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Albatayneh, A.; Alterman, D.; Page, A.; Moghtaderi, B. Alternative Method to the Replication of Wind Effects into the Buildings Thermal Simulation. Buildings 2020, 10, 237. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10120237

AMA Style

Albatayneh A, Alterman D, Page A, Moghtaderi B. Alternative Method to the Replication of Wind Effects into the Buildings Thermal Simulation. Buildings. 2020; 10(12):237. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10120237

Chicago/Turabian Style

Albatayneh, Aiman; Alterman, Dariusz; Page, Adrian; Moghtaderi, Behdad. 2020. "Alternative Method to the Replication of Wind Effects into the Buildings Thermal Simulation" Buildings 10, no. 12: 237. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings10120237

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop