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Mechanical Behavior of Two Ferrite–Martensite Dual-Phase Steels over a Broad Range of Strain Rates

1
Collaborative Innovation Center of steel Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083, China
2
Department of Materials Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2B2, Canada
3
Xin Yu Iron and Steel Co., Ltd., Xinyu 338001, Jiangxi, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Metals 2018, 8(4), 236; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8040236
Received: 27 February 2018 / Revised: 22 March 2018 / Accepted: 26 March 2018 / Published: 3 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mechanical Behavior of High-Strength Low-Alloy Steels)
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Abstract

The present study concerns the deformation and fracture behavior of two ferrite–martensite dual phase steels (FMDP660 and FMDP780) with different phase fractions subjected to different strain rate (0.001 s−1 to 1000 s−1) tensile testing. For both steels, the yield strength (YS) monotonically increased with strain rates, whereas the values of ultimate tensile strength (UTS), uniform elongation (UE) and post-uniform elongation (PUE) were maintained stable at the low strain rate range (0.001–0.1 s−1), followed by a significant increase with strain rate at high strain rate levels (0.1–1000 s−1). The FMDP780 steel with a higher fraction of martensite possessed a stronger strain rate sensitivity of tensile strength and elongation (UE and PUE) values at the high strain rate stage, compared with the FMDP660 sample. The change of UTS and UE with different strain rates and phase fractions was highly related to the strain hardening behavior, which was controlled by the dislocation multiplication in ferrite, as validated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fracture surface of the two steels was characterized by dimpled-type fracture associated with microvoid formation at the ferrite–martensite interfaces, regardless of the strain rates. The change of the dimple size and PUE value of the two steels with strain rates was attributed to the effect of adiabatic heating during tensile testing. View Full-Text
Keywords: Ferrite–martensite dual-phase (FMDP) steel; dynamic tensile testing; dislocation multiplication; adiabatic heating; failure mechanism Ferrite–martensite dual-phase (FMDP) steel; dynamic tensile testing; dislocation multiplication; adiabatic heating; failure mechanism
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Liang, J.; Zhao, Z.; Wu, H.; Peng, C.; Sun, B.; Guo, B.; Liang, J.; Tang, D. Mechanical Behavior of Two Ferrite–Martensite Dual-Phase Steels over a Broad Range of Strain Rates. Metals 2018, 8, 236.

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