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Open AccessArticle

Phenotype-Driven Plasma Biobanking Strategies and Methods

1
Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37203, USA
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Vanderbilt Technologies for Advanced Genomics Core Facility, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
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Departments of Pediatrics and Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
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Jim Ayers Institute for Precancer Detection and Diagnosis, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
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Department of Biochemistry, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
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Department of Emergency Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
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Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
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Vanderbilt Translational and Clinical Cardiovascular (VTRACC) Research Group, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Lori A. Orlando
J. Pers. Med. 2015, 5(2), 140-152; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm5020140
Received: 31 January 2015 / Accepted: 5 May 2015 / Published: 14 May 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biobanking and EHR/EMR)
Biobank development and integration with clinical data from electronic medical record (EMR) databases have enabled recent strides in genomic research and personalized medicine. BioVU, Vanderbilt’s DNA biorepository linked to de-identified clinical EMRs, has proven fruitful in its capacity to extensively appeal to numerous areas of biomedical and clinical research, supporting the discovery of genotype-phenotype interactions. Expanding on experiences in BioVU creation and development, we have recently embarked on a parallel effort to collect plasma in addition to DNA from blood specimens leftover after routine clinical testing at Vanderbilt. This initiative offers expanded utility of BioVU by combining proteomic and metabolomic approaches with genomics and/or clinical outcomes, widening the breadth for potential research and subsequent future impact on clinical care. Here, we describe the considerations and components involved in implementing a plasma biobank program from a feasibility assessment through pilot sample collection. View Full-Text
Keywords: biobanking; plasma; proteomics; BioVU; biorepository biobanking; plasma; proteomics; BioVU; biorepository
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Bowton, E.A.; Collier, S.P.; Wang, X.; Sutcliffe, C.B.; Van Driest, S.L.; Couch, L.J.; Herrera, M.; Jerome, R.N.; Slebos, R.J.C.; Alborn, W.E.; Liebler, D.C.; McNaughton, C.D.; Mernaugh, R.L.; Wells, Q.S.; Brown, N.J.; Roden, D.M.; Pulley, J.M. Phenotype-Driven Plasma Biobanking Strategies and Methods. J. Pers. Med. 2015, 5, 140-152.

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