Next Article in Journal
Statistical Shape Analysis of Ascending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm: Correlation between Shape and Biomechanical Descriptors
Previous Article in Journal
New Insights into the Molecular Bases of Familial Alzheimer’s Disease
Open AccessArticle

Opioid Induced Hyperalgesia, a Research Phenomenon or a Clinical Reality? Results of a Canadian Survey

1
Pain Center. Centre Universitaire de l’Université de Montréal, CHUM, Montreal, QC H2X 3E4, Canada
2
Montreal Hearth Institute, Montreal, QC H1T 1C8, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Pers. Med. 2020, 10(2), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm10020027
Received: 24 January 2020 / Revised: 14 March 2020 / Accepted: 16 April 2020 / Published: 21 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chronic Pain)
Background: Very little is known regarding the prevalence of opioid induced hyperalgesia (OIH) in day to day medical practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physician’s perception of the prevalence of OIH within their practice, and to assess the level of physician’s knowledge with respect to the identification and treatment of this problem. Methods: An electronic questionnaire was distributed to physicians who work in anesthesiology, chronic pain, and/or palliative care in Canada. Results: Of the 462 responses received, most were from male (69%) anesthesiologists (89.6%), in the age range of 36 to 64 years old (79.8%). In this study, the suspected prevalence of OIH using the average number of patients treated per year with opioids was 0.002% per patient per physician practice year for acute pain, and 0.01% per patient per physician practice year for chronic pain. Most physicians (70.2%) did not use clinical tests to help make a diagnosis of OIH. The treatment modalities most frequently used were the addition of an NMDA antagonist, combined with lowering the opioid doses and using opioid rotation. Conclusions: The perceived prevalence of OIH in clinical practice is a relatively rare phenomenon. Furthermore, more than half of physicians did not use a clinical test to confirm the diagnosis of OIH. The two main treatment modalities used were NMDA antagonists and opioid rotation. The criteria for the diagnosis of OIH still need to be accurately defined. View Full-Text
Keywords: opioid induced hyperalgesia; opioid tolerance; acute pain; chronic non-cancer pain; cancer pain opioid induced hyperalgesia; opioid tolerance; acute pain; chronic non-cancer pain; cancer pain
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Vargas-Schaffer, G.; Paquet, S.; Neron, A.; Cogan, J. Opioid Induced Hyperalgesia, a Research Phenomenon or a Clinical Reality? Results of a Canadian Survey. J. Pers. Med. 2020, 10, 27.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop