Next Article in Journal
Flotation Behavior of Different Colored Fluorites Using Sodium Oleate as a Collector
Next Article in Special Issue
A Micro-Comb Test System for In Situ Investigation of Infiltration and Crystallization Processes
Previous Article in Journal
Bioelectrochemical Changes during the Early Stages of Chalcopyrite Interaction with Acidithiobacillus Thiooxidans and Leptospirillum sp.
Previous Article in Special Issue
Physicochemical and Additive Controls on the Multistep Precipitation Pathway of Gypsum
Article Menu
Issue 9 (September) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Minerals 2017, 7(9), 158; https://doi.org/10.3390/min7090158

In Situ Atomic Force Microscopy Studies on Nucleation and Self-Assembly of Biogenic and Bio-Inspired Materials

1
Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47403, USA
2
Department of Chemistry, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209, USA
3
Department of Chemistry, Grand View University, Des Moines, IA 50316, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 May 2017 / Revised: 14 August 2017 / Accepted: 16 August 2017 / Published: 31 August 2017
Full-Text   |   PDF [3793 KB, uploaded 31 August 2017]   |  

Abstract

Through billions of years of evolution, nature has been able to create highly sophisticated and ordered structures in living systems, including cells, cellular components and viruses. The formation of these structures involves nucleation and self-assembly, which are fundamental physical processes associated with the formation of any ordered structure. It is important to understand how biogenic materials self-assemble into functional and highly ordered structures in order to determine the mechanisms of biological systems, as well as design and produce new classes of materials which are inspired by nature but equipped with better physiochemical properties for our purposes. An ideal tool for the study of nucleation and self-assembly is in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM), which has been widely used in this field and further developed for different applications in recent years. The main aim of this work is to review the latest contributions that have been reported on studies of nucleation and self-assembly of biogenic and bio-inspired materials using in situ AFM. We will address this topic by introducing the background of AFM, and discussing recent in situ AFM studies on nucleation and self-assembly of soft biogenic, soft bioinspired and hard materials. View Full-Text
Keywords: in situ atomic force microscopy; nucleation; self-assembly; biomaterials; biomimetic; bioinspired in situ atomic force microscopy; nucleation; self-assembly; biomaterials; biomimetic; bioinspired
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed
Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Zeng, C.; Vitale-Sullivan, C.; Ma, X. In Situ Atomic Force Microscopy Studies on Nucleation and Self-Assembly of Biogenic and Bio-Inspired Materials. Minerals 2017, 7, 158.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Minerals EISSN 2075-163X Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top