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Article

Sr-Nd-Pb-Ca Isotopes of Holocene Basalts from Jingpohu, NE China: Implications for the Origin of Their Enriched Mantle Signatures

by 1,2,*, 1,2 and 1,2
1
Jilin Changbaishan Volcano National Observation and Research Station, Institute of Geology, China Earthquake Administration (CEA), Beijing 100029, China
2
Key Laboratory of Seismic and Volcanic Hazards, China Earthquake Administration (CEA), Beijing 100029, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Martin Bromann Klausen
Minerals 2021, 11(8), 790; https://doi.org/10.3390/min11080790
Received: 31 May 2021 / Revised: 17 July 2021 / Accepted: 18 July 2021 / Published: 21 July 2021
The geochemistry on Holocene lavas from the Jingpohu volcanic field in NE China are compared with other Cenozoic lavas from across the back-arc rift of NE China, in order to constrain their enriched mantle sources. Holocene lavas within Jingpohu volcanic field comprise two separate “Crater Forest” (CF) and “Frog Pool” (FP) volcanic areas. FP lavas have lower MgO, CaO, and heavy rare earth elements and higher Al2O3, Na2O, K2O, and large-ion lithophile elements than CF lavas. Yet, both CF and FP lavas share similar isotopic signatures, with depleted Sr and Nd isotopes (87Sr/86Sr = 0.703915–0.704556, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.512656–0.512849) and unradiogenic Pb isotopes (208Pb/204Pb = 37.79–38.06, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.45–15.54, 206Pb/204Pb = 17.49–18.15), similar to oceanic island basalts. An important new constraint for the Jingpohu lavas lies in their Ca isotopes of δ44/40Ca from 0.63‰ to 0.77‰, which are lower than that of the bulk silicate earth (0.94 ± 0.05‰). By comparing the isotopic signatures of sodic lavas with that of the potassic lavas across NE China, we propose a three-component mixing model as the source for the sodic lavas. In consistence with geophysical results, we propose that subducting Pacific plate induces asthenospheric mantle upwelling of an upper depleted mantle (DM), including subducted ancient sediments (EM I), which partially melted upon ascent. These primary melts further interacted with the lithospheric mantle (EM II), before differentiating within crustal magma chambers and erupting. View Full-Text
Keywords: Jingpohu volcano; EM I; EM II; Ca isotope; Pacific plate Jingpohu volcano; EM I; EM II; Ca isotope; Pacific plate
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wei, F.; Pan, B.; Xu, J. Sr-Nd-Pb-Ca Isotopes of Holocene Basalts from Jingpohu, NE China: Implications for the Origin of Their Enriched Mantle Signatures. Minerals 2021, 11, 790. https://doi.org/10.3390/min11080790

AMA Style

Wei F, Pan B, Xu J. Sr-Nd-Pb-Ca Isotopes of Holocene Basalts from Jingpohu, NE China: Implications for the Origin of Their Enriched Mantle Signatures. Minerals. 2021; 11(8):790. https://doi.org/10.3390/min11080790

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wei, Feixiang, Bo Pan, and Jiandong Xu. 2021. "Sr-Nd-Pb-Ca Isotopes of Holocene Basalts from Jingpohu, NE China: Implications for the Origin of Their Enriched Mantle Signatures" Minerals 11, no. 8: 790. https://doi.org/10.3390/min11080790

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