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Article

Geochemical Features of Redox-Sensitive Trace Metals in Sediments under Oxygen-Depleted Marine Environments

1
Ocean Resources Research Center for Next Generation, Chiba Institute of Technology, 2-17-1 Tsudanuma, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016, Japan
2
Frontier Research Center for Energy and Resources, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan
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Department of Systems Innovation, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan
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Center for Advanced Marine Core Research, Kochi University, B200 Monobe, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8502, Japan
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Submarine Resources Research Center, Research Institute for Marine Resources Utilization, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 2-15 Natsushima-cho, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 237-0061, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Minerals 2020, 10(11), 1021; https://doi.org/10.3390/min10111021
Received: 13 September 2020 / Revised: 26 October 2020 / Accepted: 13 November 2020 / Published: 17 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Mineralogy and Biogeochemistry)
Organic- and sulfide-rich sediments have formed in oxygen-depleted environments throughout Earth’s history. The fact that they are generally enriched in redox-sensitive elements reflects the sedimentary environment at the time of deposition. Although the modern ocean is well oxidized, oxygen depletion occurs in certain areas such as restricted basins and high-productivity zones. We measured bulk chemical compositions (major and trace elements, total organic carbon, and total sulfur) of organic- and sulfide-rich sediments collected from eight areas having oxygen-depleted water to discuss relationships between geochemical features and sedimentary environments. Major elemental compositions generally show mixtures of terrigenous detritus and biogenic carbonate. Some redox-sensitive elements might be controlled by organic matter content, whereas others could be contained in sulfide minerals in sediments. In particular, Mo and U show a characteristic trend; areas with higher Mo and U—at least partially owing to a depositional process called the “particulate shuttle”—generally correspond to regions influenced by the open ocean. In contrast, areas with lower Mo and U are more restricted marine environments. This suggests that the degree of Mo and U enrichment reflects the geography in terms of proximity to the open ocean, or the degree of the supply of these elements from the open ocean. View Full-Text
Keywords: sediment geochemistry; oxygen-depleted conditions; redox-sensitive elements; organic-rich sediment; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Ocean Drilling Program; International Ocean Discovery Program sediment geochemistry; oxygen-depleted conditions; redox-sensitive elements; organic-rich sediment; Deep Sea Drilling Project; Ocean Drilling Program; International Ocean Discovery Program
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yano, M.; Yasukawa, K.; Nakamura, K.; Ikehara, M.; Kato, Y. Geochemical Features of Redox-Sensitive Trace Metals in Sediments under Oxygen-Depleted Marine Environments. Minerals 2020, 10, 1021. https://doi.org/10.3390/min10111021

AMA Style

Yano M, Yasukawa K, Nakamura K, Ikehara M, Kato Y. Geochemical Features of Redox-Sensitive Trace Metals in Sediments under Oxygen-Depleted Marine Environments. Minerals. 2020; 10(11):1021. https://doi.org/10.3390/min10111021

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yano, Moei, Kazutaka Yasukawa, Kentaro Nakamura, Minoru Ikehara, and Yasuhiro Kato. 2020. "Geochemical Features of Redox-Sensitive Trace Metals in Sediments under Oxygen-Depleted Marine Environments" Minerals 10, no. 11: 1021. https://doi.org/10.3390/min10111021

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