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Correction: Li, J.; et al. The Impact of Lake Water Quality on the Performance of Mature Artificial Recharge Ponds. Water 2019, 11, 1991
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The Link between Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement (PICP) Design and Nutrient Removal

Department of Civil Engineering, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa
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Water 2020, 12(6), 1714; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12061714
Received: 26 May 2020 / Revised: 10 June 2020 / Accepted: 11 June 2020 / Published: 16 June 2020
The construction of ‘hard’ impermeable surfaces in urban areas results in the increased flow of stormwater runoff and its associated pollutants into downstream receiving waters. Permeable Pavement Systems (PPS) can help mitigate this. The most common type of PPS in South Africa is permeable interlocking concrete pavement (PICP), but there is currently insufficient information available on the relative treatment performance of different PICP designs. This paper describes an investigation into the performance of ten different PICP systems constructed in the Civil Engineering Laboratory at the University of Cape Town for the treatment of various nutrients commonly found in stormwater runoff. It was found that removal efficiencies ranged from 27.5% to 78.7% for ammonia-nitrogen and from −37% to 11% for orthophosphate-phosphorus; whilst 4% to 20.2% more nitrite-nitrogen and 160% to 2580% more nitrate-nitrogen were simultaneously added. The presence of a geotextile resulted in higher ammonia-nitrogen removal efficiencies but also higher nitrate-nitrogen addition than those cells without—with small differences between various types. The cell with a permanently wet ‘sump’ had the highest nitrate-nitrogen addition of all. Lower pH results in higher nitrate-nitrogen concentrations, whilst the electrical conductivity strongly depends on the length of the periods between rainfall ‘seasons’, decreasing rapidly during wet periods but increasing during dry periods. Paver type also had a minor impact on nutrient removal. View Full-Text
Keywords: permeable interlocking concrete pavement (PICP); nutrient removal from stormwater; sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) permeable interlocking concrete pavement (PICP); nutrient removal from stormwater; sustainable drainage systems (SuDS)
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Liu, B.K.; Armitage, N.P. The Link between Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement (PICP) Design and Nutrient Removal. Water 2020, 12, 1714.

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