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Open AccessArticle

Syrian Refugees, Water Scarcity, and Dynamic Policies: How Do the New Refugee Discourses Impact Water Governance Debates in Lebanon and Jordan?

1
Department of Politics and International Relations (DPIR), University of Oxford, Manor Road, Oxford OX1 3UQ, UK
2
International Agricultural Policy and Environmental Governance, Faculty of Organic Agricultural Sciences, University of Kassel, 37213 Witzenhausen, Germany
3
United Nations Development Program, Regional Bureau for Arab States, Amman 11194, Jordan
4
Food Security Program, Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences, American University of Beirut, Beirut 1103, Lebanon
5
Political Sciences and Public Administration, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, American University of Beirut, Beirut 1103, Lebanon
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(2), 325; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12020325
Received: 26 November 2019 / Revised: 8 January 2020 / Accepted: 20 January 2020 / Published: 22 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from 2019 World Water Week)
Since the Syrian crisis and the so-called “Arab Spring”, new discourses have been created, sparking the discursive water governance debates around water scarcity and hydropolitics. In Lebanon and Jordan—where most water resources are transboundary, and where most Syrian refugees have flown in—new discourses of climate change and especially of Syrian refugees as exacerbating water scarcity are emerging, shaping water governance debates. The aim of this paper is to engage in comparative discourse analysis about narratives of water crises and refugees in Lebanon and Jordan. This study is novel because of the focus on the new discourse of refugees in relation to water governance debates in both Lebanon and Jordan. This paper finds that in both countries the new discourses of refugees do not replace previous and existing discourses of water crisis and scarcity, but rather they build on and reinforce them. This paper finds that the impact these discourses had on the governance debates is that in Lebanon the resources mobilized focused on humanitarian interventions, while Jordan focused on development projects to strengthen the resilience of its water infrastructure and its overall water governance system. View Full-Text
Keywords: hydropolitics; Lebanon; Jordan; Syrian crisis; water scarcity; discourse analysis hydropolitics; Lebanon; Jordan; Syrian crisis; water scarcity; discourse analysis
MDPI and ACS Style

Hussein, H.; Natta, A.; Yehya, A.A.K.; Hamadna, B. Syrian Refugees, Water Scarcity, and Dynamic Policies: How Do the New Refugee Discourses Impact Water Governance Debates in Lebanon and Jordan? Water 2020, 12, 325.

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