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Article

Are Sterols Useful for the Identification of Sources of Faecal Contamination in Shellfish? A Case Study

1
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Essex, Colchester CO4 3SQ, UK
2
Centre for Environmental Sustainability and Remediation, School of Science, RMIT University, Bundoora 3083, Victoria, Australia
3
ARC Training Centre for the Transformation of Australia’s Biosolids Resource, RMIT University, Bundoora 3083, Victoria, Australia
4
NILU—Norwegian Institute for Air Research, P.O. Box 100, 2027 Kjeller, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(11), 3076; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113076
Received: 28 September 2020 / Revised: 24 October 2020 / Accepted: 27 October 2020 / Published: 2 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Aquatic Systems—Quality and Contamination)
This work aimed to identify the major source(s) of faecal pollution impacting Salcott Creek oyster fisheries in the UK through the examination of the sterol profiles. The concentration of the major sewage biomarker, coprostanol, in water overlying the oysters varied between 0.01 µg L−1 and 1.20 µg L−1. The coprostanol/epicoprostanol ratio ranged from 1.32 (September) to 33.25 (February), suggesting that human sewage represents the key input of faecal material into the estuary. However, a correlation between the sterol profile of water above the oysters with that of water that enters from Tiptree Sewage Treatment Works (r = 0.82), and a sample from a site (Quinces Corner) observed to have a high population of Brent geese (r = 0.82), suggests that both sources contribute to the faecal pollution affecting the oysters. In identifying these key faecal inputs, sterol profiling has allowed targeted management practices to be employed to ensure that oyster quality is optimised. View Full-Text
Keywords: faecal contamination; oysters; shellfisheries; sterols; coprostanol faecal contamination; oysters; shellfisheries; sterols; coprostanol
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MDPI and ACS Style

Florini, S.; Shahsavari, E.; Aburto-Medina, A.; Khudur, L.S.; Mudge, S.M.; Smith, D.J.; Ball, A.S. Are Sterols Useful for the Identification of Sources of Faecal Contamination in Shellfish? A Case Study. Water 2020, 12, 3076. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113076

AMA Style

Florini S, Shahsavari E, Aburto-Medina A, Khudur LS, Mudge SM, Smith DJ, Ball AS. Are Sterols Useful for the Identification of Sources of Faecal Contamination in Shellfish? A Case Study. Water. 2020; 12(11):3076. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113076

Chicago/Turabian Style

Florini, Styliano; Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Aburto-Medina, Arturo; Khudur, Leadin S.; Mudge, Stephen M.; Smith, David J.; Ball, Andrew S. 2020. "Are Sterols Useful for the Identification of Sources of Faecal Contamination in Shellfish? A Case Study" Water 12, no. 11: 3076. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113076

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