Next Article in Journal
On the Use of a Real-Time Control Approach for Urban Stormwater Management
Next Article in Special Issue
Numerical Study on the Hydrologic Characteristic of Permeable Friction Course Pavement
Previous Article in Journal
Interplay of the Factors Affecting Water Flux and Salt Rejection in Membrane Distillation: A State-of-the-Art Critical Review
Previous Article in Special Issue
Analysis of Infiltrating Water Characteristics of Permeable Pavements in a Parking Lot at Full Scale
Article

Reduction of Environmental Impacts Due to Using Permeable Pavements to Harvest Stormwater

1
Department of Civil Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis 88040-900, Brazil
2
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XQ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(10), 2840; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102840
Received: 16 September 2020 / Revised: 2 October 2020 / Accepted: 9 October 2020 / Published: 13 October 2020
While rainwater harvesting can provide additional water resources, this approach is largely undertaken using water from roofs. More recently, the potential for using stormwater harvested from permeable pavements was recognised as a potential additional water resource. The objective of this study was to estimate the reduction of environmental impacts caused by traditional drainage systems and centralised water utilities if permeable pavement systems were used to harvest stormwater for nonpotable purposes in buildings. The lifecycle environmental impacts and costs associated with the proposed pavements and hydraulic systems were assessed. The city of Glasgow was chosen as a case study. We used the Netuno computer programme to estimate the potential for potable water savings considering the use of stormwater for nonpotable purposes and the SimaPro software to perform a lifecycle assessment (LCA). With the implementation of permeable pavements and stormwater utilisation, great reductions in lifecycle emissions (i.e., CO2-, SO2-, and PM2.5-equivalent emissions) were observed. The proposed system also proved to be economically feasible, i.e., a payback period equal to 16.9 years. The results show the economic and environmental feasibility of permeable pavements when used on a large scale, proving to be an important strategy to reduce water and environmental stresses caused by centralised water utilities and traditional drainage systems. View Full-Text
Keywords: stormwater; permeable pavement; life cycle assessment; environmental impacts; drainage systems; water supply stormwater; permeable pavement; life cycle assessment; environmental impacts; drainage systems; water supply
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Antunes, L.N.; Sydney, C.; Ghisi, E.; Phoenix, V.R.; Thives, L.P.; White, C.; Garcia, E.S.H. Reduction of Environmental Impacts Due to Using Permeable Pavements to Harvest Stormwater. Water 2020, 12, 2840. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102840

AMA Style

Antunes LN, Sydney C, Ghisi E, Phoenix VR, Thives LP, White C, Garcia ESH. Reduction of Environmental Impacts Due to Using Permeable Pavements to Harvest Stormwater. Water. 2020; 12(10):2840. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102840

Chicago/Turabian Style

Antunes, Lucas N.; Sydney, Calum; Ghisi, Enedir; Phoenix, Vernon R.; Thives, Liseane P.; White, Christopher; Garcia, Emmanuelle S.H. 2020. "Reduction of Environmental Impacts Due to Using Permeable Pavements to Harvest Stormwater" Water 12, no. 10: 2840. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102840

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop