Next Article in Journal
Improving Hydrologic Simulations of a Small Watershed through Soil Data Integration
Previous Article in Journal
Monitoring of Soil Water Content in Maize Rotated with Pigeonpea Fallows in South Africa
Review

Nutrient Retention in Ecologically Functional Floodplains: A Review

1
American Rivers, 1101 14th Street NW, Suite 1400, Washington, DC 20005, USA
2
Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineering, University of Minnesota, 1390 Eckles Ave., St. Paul, Minneapolis, MN 55108, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(10), 2762; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102762
Received: 11 August 2020 / Revised: 27 September 2020 / Accepted: 28 September 2020 / Published: 4 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue River Floodplain Restoration)
Nutrient loads in fresh and coastal waters continue to lead to harmful algal blooms across the globe. Historically, floodplains—low-lying areas adjacent to streams and rivers that become inundated during high-flow events—would have been nutrient deposition and/or removal sites within riparian corridors, but many floodplains have been developed and/or disconnected. This review synthesizes literature and data available from field studies quantifying nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) removal within floodplains across North America and Europe to determine how effective floodplain restoration is at removing nutrients. The mean removal of nitrate-N (NO3-N), the primary form of N in floodplain studies, was 200 (SD = 198) kg-N ha−1 year−1, and of total or particulate P was 21.0 (SD = 31.4) kg-P ha−1 year−1. Based on the literature, more effective designs of restored floodplains should include optimal hydraulic load, permanent wetlands, geomorphic diversity, and dense vegetation. Floodplain restorations along waterways with higher nutrient concentrations could lead to a more effective investment for nutrient removal. Overall, restoring and reconnecting floodplains throughout watersheds is a viable and effective means of removing nutrients while also restoring the many other benefits that floodplains provide. View Full-Text
Keywords: floodplain restoration; nitrogen; phosphorus; nutrient retention; algal blooms floodplain restoration; nitrogen; phosphorus; nutrient retention; algal blooms
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Gordon, B.A.; Dorothy, O.; Lenhart, C.F. Nutrient Retention in Ecologically Functional Floodplains: A Review. Water 2020, 12, 2762. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102762

AMA Style

Gordon BA, Dorothy O, Lenhart CF. Nutrient Retention in Ecologically Functional Floodplains: A Review. Water. 2020; 12(10):2762. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102762

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gordon, Brad A.; Dorothy, Olivia; Lenhart, Christian F. 2020. "Nutrient Retention in Ecologically Functional Floodplains: A Review" Water 12, no. 10: 2762. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102762

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop