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Open AccessArticle

2004–2016 Wintertime Atmospheric Blocking Events over Western Siberia and Their Effect on Surface Temperature Anomalies

1
Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS, Academician Zuev square 1, 634021 Tomsk, Russia
2
Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, SB RAS, p/o box 291; Lermontov st., 126a, 664033 Irkutsk, Russia
3
Institute of Monitoring of Climatic and Ecological Systems SB RAS, 10/3, Academichesky, 634055 Tomsk, Russia
4
Siberian Regional Hydrometeorological Research Institute, Sovetskaya 30, 630099 Novosibirsk, Russia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2018, 9(2), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9020072
Received: 23 December 2017 / Revised: 12 February 2018 / Accepted: 13 February 2018 / Published: 16 February 2018
Western Siberia is a large area in Northern Eurasia, which lies between the Urals and the Yenisei River. The atmospheric blocking events are not a frequent phenomenon in this region. Nevertheless, they noticeably affect the weather and living conditions of people there. We have investigated 14 winter blocking events, identified over Western Siberia, over 2004–2016, and have studied their effect on the surface temperature in this region. We have compared each of the 14 blocking events to the corresponding surface temperature anomalies in the north and in the south of Western Siberia. As a result, the temperature anomalies were separated into two groups: (1) dipole, with a positive surface temperature anomaly (or close to the norm) in the north, and with a negative anomaly (or close to the norm) in the south, and (2) non-dipole. Ten events were attributed to Group 1, four events were referred to Group 2. Analyzing the potential temperature on the dynamic tropopause (advection characteristic) showed that the Group 1 events feature strong advection over the investigated territory. In the non-dipole situations from Group 2 Western Siberia are away from strong blocking events. View Full-Text
Keywords: atmospheric blocking event; wintertime circulation; surface temperature anomaly; cold winter atmospheric blocking event; wintertime circulation; surface temperature anomaly; cold winter
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MDPI and ACS Style

Antokhina, O.Y.; Antokhin, P.N.; Devyatova, E.V.; Martynova, Y.V. 2004–2016 Wintertime Atmospheric Blocking Events over Western Siberia and Their Effect on Surface Temperature Anomalies. Atmosphere 2018, 9, 72. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9020072

AMA Style

Antokhina OY, Antokhin PN, Devyatova EV, Martynova YV. 2004–2016 Wintertime Atmospheric Blocking Events over Western Siberia and Their Effect on Surface Temperature Anomalies. Atmosphere. 2018; 9(2):72. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9020072

Chicago/Turabian Style

Antokhina, Olga Y.; Antokhin, Pavel N.; Devyatova, Elena V.; Martynova, Yuliya V. 2018. "2004–2016 Wintertime Atmospheric Blocking Events over Western Siberia and Their Effect on Surface Temperature Anomalies" Atmosphere 9, no. 2: 72. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9020072

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