Special Issue "Selected Papers from The 2nd International Electronic Conference on Atmospheric Sciences"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Meteorology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Anthony R. Lupo
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Guest Editor
Department of Soil, Environmental, and Atmospheric Science, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211, USA
Interests: dynamic meteorology; synoptic meteorology; climate dynamics; climate variability
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Luis Gimeno
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Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Patrick S. Market
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Guest Editor
Department of Soils, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211, USA
Interests: synoptic-dynamic meteorology; banded heavy precipitation; thundersnow; elevated convection
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Prof. Dr. Igor I. Mokhov
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Guest Editor
Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia
Prof. Dr. Nicole Mölders
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Guest Editor
Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Geophysical Institute and College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 903, Koyukuk Drive, Fairbanks, AK 99775-7320, USA
Interests: human and natural impacts on weather; air quality and climate; land-cover/use impacts on cloud and precipitation formation; pollution in remote locations; wind energy; evaluation of air-quality model results
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Prof. Dr. Yafei Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Chinese Academy of Meteorological Science, China
Interests: dynamical climate/meteorology; synoptic meteorology; monsoon; air–sea interaction
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will publish selected papers from the Proceedings of the 2nd International Electronic Conference on Atmospheric Science, held 16–31 July, 2017, on sciforum.net, an online platform for hosting scholarly e-conferences and discussion groups. For this inaugural edition of the electronic conference, contributors were invited to provide papers and presentations from subjects across atmospheric science, such as atmospheric physics, chemistry, synoptic and dynamic meteorology, regional climate and interannual variability, and tropical meteorology. The selected papers are those that attracted the most interest on the web or that provided an innovative contribution will be considered for publication. These papers have been subject to peer review and are published with the aim of rapid and wide dissemination of research results, developments and applications. It is our hope that this conference will present new and useful developments related to all areas of atmospheric sciences. We also hope that the idea of an electronic conference will grow rapidly, and in the future become recognized as a new venue for presenting scientific discovery.

Prof. Dr. Anthony R. Lupo
Dr. Luis Gimeno
Prof. Dr. Patrick S. Market
Prof. Dr. Igor I. Mokhov
Prof. Dr. Nicole Mölders
Prof. Dr. Yafei Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Atmospheric science
  • Atmospheric physics
  • Atmospheric chemistry
  • Climate dynamics
  • Climate change
  • Weather forecasting
  • Climate variability
  • Tropical meteorology
  • Interannual and interdecadal variability
  • Teleconnections

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
2004–2016 Wintertime Atmospheric Blocking Events over Western Siberia and Their Effect on Surface Temperature Anomalies
Atmosphere 2018, 9(2), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9020072 - 16 Feb 2018
Abstract
Western Siberia is a large area in Northern Eurasia, which lies between the Urals and the Yenisei River. The atmospheric blocking events are not a frequent phenomenon in this region. Nevertheless, they noticeably affect the weather and living conditions of people there. We [...] Read more.
Western Siberia is a large area in Northern Eurasia, which lies between the Urals and the Yenisei River. The atmospheric blocking events are not a frequent phenomenon in this region. Nevertheless, they noticeably affect the weather and living conditions of people there. We have investigated 14 winter blocking events, identified over Western Siberia, over 2004–2016, and have studied their effect on the surface temperature in this region. We have compared each of the 14 blocking events to the corresponding surface temperature anomalies in the north and in the south of Western Siberia. As a result, the temperature anomalies were separated into two groups: (1) dipole, with a positive surface temperature anomaly (or close to the norm) in the north, and with a negative anomaly (or close to the norm) in the south, and (2) non-dipole. Ten events were attributed to Group 1, four events were referred to Group 2. Analyzing the potential temperature on the dynamic tropopause (advection characteristic) showed that the Group 1 events feature strong advection over the investigated territory. In the non-dipole situations from Group 2 Western Siberia are away from strong blocking events. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Observing Actual Evapotranspiration from Flux Tower Eddy Covariance Measurements within a Hilly Watershed: Case Study of the Kamech Site, Cap Bon Peninsula, Tunisia
Atmosphere 2018, 9(2), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9020068 - 15 Feb 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
There is a strong need for long term observations of land surface fluxes such as actual evapotranspiration (ETa). Eddy covariance (EC) method is widely used to provide ETa measurements, and several gap-filling methods have been proposed to complete inherent missing data. However, implementing [...] Read more.
There is a strong need for long term observations of land surface fluxes such as actual evapotranspiration (ETa). Eddy covariance (EC) method is widely used to provide ETa measurements, and several gap-filling methods have been proposed to complete inherent missing data. However, implementing gap-filling methods is questionable for EC time series collected within hilly agricultural areas at the watershed extent. Indeed, changes in wind direction induce changes in airflow inclination and footprint, and therefore possibly induce changes in the relationships on which rely gap-filling methods. This study aimed to obtain continuous ETa time series by adapting gap-filling methods to the particular conditions abovementioned. The experiment took place within an agricultural watershed in north-eastern Tunisia. A 9.6-m-high EC flux tower has been operating close to the watershed center since 2010. The sensible and latent heat fluxes data collected from 2010 to 2013 were quality controlled, and the REddyProc software was used to fill gaps at the hourly timescale. Adapting REddyProc method consisted of splitting the dataset according to wind direction, which improved the flux data at the hourly timescale, but not at the daily and monthly timescales. Finally, complete time series permitted to analyze seasonal and inter-annual variability of ETa. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Vortex Motion State of the Dry Atmosphere with Nonzero Velocity Divergence
Atmosphere 2018, 9(2), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9020061 - 10 Feb 2018
Abstract
In the present work, an analytical model of the vortex motion basic state of the dry atmosphere with nonzero air velocity divergence is constructed. It is shown that the air parcel moves along the open curve trajectory of spiral geometry. It is found [...] Read more.
In the present work, an analytical model of the vortex motion basic state of the dry atmosphere with nonzero air velocity divergence is constructed. It is shown that the air parcel moves along the open curve trajectory of spiral geometry. It is found that for the case of nonzero velocity divergence, the atmospheric basic state presents an unlimited sequence of vortex cells transiting from one to another. On the other hand, at zero divergence, the basic state presents a pair of connected vortices, and the trajectory is a closed curve. If in some cells the air parcel moves upward, then in the adjacent cells, it will move downward, and vice versa. Upon reaching the cell’s middle height, the parcel reverses the direction of rotation. When the parcel moves upward, the motion is of anticyclonic type in the lower part of the vortex cell and of cyclonic type in the upper part. When the parcel moves downward, the motion is of anticyclonic type in the upper part of the vortex cell and of cyclonic type in the lower part. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Raindrop Size Distribution on Throughfall Dynamics under Pine and Birch Trees at the Rainfall Event Level
Atmosphere 2017, 8(12), 240; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos8120240 - 02 Dec 2017
Cited by 10
Abstract
Part of precipitation is intercepted by forest canopies, while the rest reaches the ground as throughfall or stemflow. This process is influenced by various meteorological variables, of which we have mainly focused on drop diameter and velocity. Rainfall in the open and throughfall [...] Read more.
Part of precipitation is intercepted by forest canopies, while the rest reaches the ground as throughfall or stemflow. This process is influenced by various meteorological variables, of which we have mainly focused on drop diameter and velocity. Rainfall in the open and throughfall under birch and pine trees have both been measured since 2014 in Ljubljana, Slovenia. The results demonstrate that the total throughfall during 3.5 years was 73% and 53% of rainfall under birch and pine trees, respectively. During the 236 analysed events, the median volume diameter was 1.8 mm (±1.7 mm), and kinetic energy between 0.01 mJ/cm2 and 23.3 mJ/cm2 was recorded. We closely analysed the effect of rainfall microstructure on throughfall under pine and birch trees during three specific rainfall events. The increase in drop diameter and fall velocity during a rainfall event instantaneously increased throughfall under pine trees between 25% and 47%, whereas no such changes were observed under birch trees. This may be the consequence of different tree properties of the two species. Additionally, in the case of a saturated canopy, throughfall under pine trees exceeded rainfall in the open after an onset of larger and faster drops. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Monitoring and Evaluation of Terni (Central Italy) Air Quality through Spatially Resolved Analyses
Atmosphere 2017, 8(10), 200; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos8100200 - 11 Oct 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
A study of spatial variability of PM10 elemental components was conducted in Terni city (Central Italy), situated in an intramountain depression characterized by the presence of several particulate matter emission sources. The meteorological conditions of the Terni basin limit the dispersion and [...] Read more.
A study of spatial variability of PM10 elemental components was conducted in Terni city (Central Italy), situated in an intramountain depression characterized by the presence of several particulate matter emission sources. The meteorological conditions of the Terni basin limit the dispersion and enhance the accumulation of atmospheric pollutants. Thanks to the utilization of new smart samplers, used for the first time and working in parallel at 23 sampling sites, spatially resolved data were obtained. Localizations of the samplers were chosen in order to evaluate the impact of different local PM10 sources. Chemical composition of the samples was determined in combination with a chemical fractioning procedure that allowed us to discriminate water-soluble and residual fractions of analyzed elements in which proved to be a valuable approach for increasing selectivity of elements as source tracers. Spatial variability of elements underlined the contribution of local emission sources and the different dispersion capacity of each element. The city of Terni resulted to be an ideal area to test and validate a new experimental method for the acquisition of spatially resolved data providing the possibility to properly evaluate the spatial variability of PM10 and its chemical components. Full article
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