Next Article in Journal
Climate Change and Water-Related Infectious Diseases
Next Article in Special Issue
Non-Monotonic Dependencies of Cloud Microphysics and Precipitation on Aerosol Loading in Deep Convective Clouds: A Case Study Using the WRF Model with Bin Microphysics
Previous Article in Journal
Natural Gas Fugitive Leak Detection Using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle: Measurement System Description and Mass Balance Approach
Previous Article in Special Issue
Development, Characterization, and Validation of a Cold Stage-Based Ice Nucleation Array (PKU-INA)
Article Menu
Issue 10 (October) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Atmosphere 2018, 9(10), 384; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos9100384

Polar Cooling Effect Due to Increase of Phytoplankton and Dimethyl-Sulfide Emission

1
Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722, Korea
2
National Climate Data Center, Korea Meteorological Administration, Seoul 07062, Korea
3
Max-Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, 55128, Germany
4
Climate Research Division, National Institute of Meteorological Sciences, Korea Meteorological Administration, Seogwipo-si Jeju-do, 63568, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 27 August 2018 / Revised: 28 September 2018 / Accepted: 29 September 2018 / Published: 1 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aerosol-Cloud Interactions)
Full-Text   |   PDF [5945 KB, uploaded 1 October 2018]   |  

Abstract

The effects of increased dimethyl-sulfide (DMS) emissions due to increased marine phytoplankton activity are examined using an atmosphere-ocean coupled climate model. As the DMS emission flux from the ocean increases globally, large-scale cooling occurs due to the DMS-cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)-cloud albedo interactions. This cooling increases as DMS emissions are further increased, with the most pronounced effect occurring over the Arctic, which is likely associated with a change in sea-ice fraction as sea ice mediates the air-sea exchange of the radiation, moisture and heat flux. These results differ from recent studies that only considered the bio-physical feedback that led to amplified Arctic warming under greenhouse warming conditions. Therefore, climate negative feedback from DMS-CCN-cloud albedo interactions that involve marine phytoplankton and its impact on polar climate should be properly reflected in future climate models to better estimate climate change, especially over the polar regions. View Full-Text
Keywords: arctic cooling effect; dimethyl-sulfide; aerosol indirect effect; sea-ice increase; climate change arctic cooling effect; dimethyl-sulfide; aerosol indirect effect; sea-ice increase; climate change
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, A.-H.; Yum, S.S.; Lee, H.; Chang, D.Y.; Shim, S. Polar Cooling Effect Due to Increase of Phytoplankton and Dimethyl-Sulfide Emission. Atmosphere 2018, 9, 384.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Atmosphere EISSN 2073-4433 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top