Next Article in Journal
Sodar Observation of the ABL Structure and Waves over the Black Sea Offshore Site
Previous Article in Journal
Rainfall and Flooding in Coastal Tourist Areas of the Canary Islands (Spain)
Open AccessArticle

Convective Shower Characteristics Simulated with the Convection-Permitting Climate Model COSMO-CLM

1
Institute for Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, Goethe University Frankfurt, 60438 Frankfurt, Germany
2
Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques, 31100 Toulouse, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2019, 10(12), 810; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10120810
Received: 24 October 2019 / Revised: 9 December 2019 / Accepted: 11 December 2019 / Published: 13 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Meteorology)
This paper evaluates convective precipitation as simulated by the convection-permitting climate model (CPM) Consortium for Small-Scale Modeling in climate mode (COSMO-CLM) (with 2.8 km grid-spacing) over Germany in the period 2001–2015. Characteristics of simulated convective precipitation objects like lifetime, area, mean intensity, and total precipitation are compared to characteristics observed by weather radar. For this purpose, a tracking algorithm was applied to simulated and observed precipitation with 5-min temporal resolution. The total amount of convective precipitation is well simulated, with a small overestimation of 2%. However, the simulation underestimates convective activity, represented by the number of convective objects, by 33%. This underestimation is especially pronounced in the lowlands of Northern Germany, whereas the simulation matches observations well in the mountainous areas of Southern Germany. The underestimation of activity is compensated by an overestimation of the simulated lifetime of convective objects. The observed mean intensity, maximum intensity, and area of precipitation objects increase with their lifetime showing the spectrum of convective storms ranging from short-living single-cell storms to long-living organized convection like supercells or squall lines. The CPM is capable of reproducing the lifetime dependence of these characteristics but shows a weaker increase in mean intensity with lifetime resulting in an especially pronounced underestimation (up to 25%) of mean precipitation intensity of long-living, extreme events. This limitation of the CPM is not identifiable by classical evaluation techniques using rain gauges. The simulation can reproduce the general increase of the highest percentiles of cell area, total precipitation, and mean intensity with temperature but fails to reproduce the increase of lifetime. The scaling rates of mean intensity and total precipitation resemble observed rates only in parts of the temperature range. The results suggest that the evaluation of coarse-grained (e.g., hourly) precipitation fields is insufficient for revealing challenges in convection-permitting simulations. View Full-Text
Keywords: precipitation; tracking; convective storms; convection-permitting simulation; COSMO-CLM precipitation; tracking; convective storms; convection-permitting simulation; COSMO-CLM
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Purr, C.; Brisson, E.; Ahrens, B. Convective Shower Characteristics Simulated with the Convection-Permitting Climate Model COSMO-CLM. Atmosphere 2019, 10, 810. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10120810

AMA Style

Purr C, Brisson E, Ahrens B. Convective Shower Characteristics Simulated with the Convection-Permitting Climate Model COSMO-CLM. Atmosphere. 2019; 10(12):810. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10120810

Chicago/Turabian Style

Purr, Christopher; Brisson, Erwan; Ahrens, Bodo. 2019. "Convective Shower Characteristics Simulated with the Convection-Permitting Climate Model COSMO-CLM" Atmosphere 10, no. 12: 810. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10120810

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop