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Review

A Multidisciplinary Review of the Inka Imperial Resettlement Policy and Implications for Future Investigations

1
Australian Centre for Ancient DNA, School of Biological Sciences and The Environment Institute, Adelaide University, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia
2
UCSC Paleogenomics, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
3
UCSC Genomics Institute, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA
4
Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage (CABAH), University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia
5
National Centre for Indigenous Genomics (NCIG), Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ornella Semino
Genes 2021, 12(2), 215; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes12020215
Received: 2 December 2020 / Revised: 29 January 2021 / Accepted: 30 January 2021 / Published: 2 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Peopling of the Americas: A Genetic Perspective)
The rulers of the Inka empire conquered approximately 2 million km2 of the South American Andes in just under 100 years from 1438–1533 CE. Inside the empire, the elite conducted a systematic resettlement of the many Indigenous peoples in the Andes that had been rapidly colonised. The nature of this resettlement phenomenon is recorded within the Spanish colonial ethnohistorical record. Here we have broadly characterised the resettlement policy, despite the often incomplete and conflicting details in the descriptions. We then review research from multiple disciplines that investigate the empirical reality of the Inka resettlement policy, including stable isotope analysis, intentional cranial deformation morphology, ceramic artefact chemical analyses and genetics. Further, we discuss the benefits and limitations of each discipline for investigating the resettlement policy and emphasise their collective value in an interdisciplinary characterisation of the resettlement policy. View Full-Text
Keywords: Inka; interdisciplinary; ethnohistory; isotopes; paleogenetics; resettlement Inka; interdisciplinary; ethnohistory; isotopes; paleogenetics; resettlement
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MDPI and ACS Style

Davidson, R.; Fehren-Schmitz, L.; Llamas, B. A Multidisciplinary Review of the Inka Imperial Resettlement Policy and Implications for Future Investigations. Genes 2021, 12, 215. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes12020215

AMA Style

Davidson R, Fehren-Schmitz L, Llamas B. A Multidisciplinary Review of the Inka Imperial Resettlement Policy and Implications for Future Investigations. Genes. 2021; 12(2):215. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes12020215

Chicago/Turabian Style

Davidson, Roberta, Lars Fehren-Schmitz, and Bastien Llamas. 2021. "A Multidisciplinary Review of the Inka Imperial Resettlement Policy and Implications for Future Investigations" Genes 12, no. 2: 215. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes12020215

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