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Open AccessFeature PaperReview

Adipocytes in Breast Cancer, the Thick and the Thin

1
Molecular Targeting Unit, Department of Research, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan 20133, Italy
2
Division of Surgical Oncology, Breast Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan 20133, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cells 2020, 9(3), 560; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9030560
Received: 30 January 2020 / Revised: 21 February 2020 / Accepted: 26 February 2020 / Published: 27 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micro- and Macro-Environmental Factors in Solid Cancers)
It is well established that breast cancer development and progression depend not only on tumor-cell intrinsic factors but also on its microenvironment and on the host characteristics. There is growing evidence that adipocytes play a role in breast cancer progression. This is supported by: (i) epidemiological studies reporting the association of obesity with a higher cancer risk and poor prognosis, (ii) recent studies demonstrating the existence of a cross-talk between breast cancer cells and adipocytes locally in the breast that leads to acquisition of an aggressive tumor phenotype, and (iii) evidence showing that cancer cachexia applies also to fat tissue and shares similarities with stromal-carcinoma metabolic synergy. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the epidemiological link between obesity and breast cancer and outlines the results of the tumor-adipocyte crosstalk. We also focus on systemic changes in body fat in patients with cachexia developed in the course of cancer. Moreover, we discuss and compare adipocyte alterations in the three pathological conditions and the mechanisms through which breast cancer progression is induced. View Full-Text
Keywords: adipocytes; breast cancer; obesity; adipokines; cancer associated adipocytes (CAAs); cachexia adipocytes; breast cancer; obesity; adipokines; cancer associated adipocytes (CAAs); cachexia
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rybinska, I.; Agresti, R.; Trapani, A.; Tagliabue, E.; Triulzi, T. Adipocytes in Breast Cancer, the Thick and the Thin. Cells 2020, 9, 560. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9030560

AMA Style

Rybinska I, Agresti R, Trapani A, Tagliabue E, Triulzi T. Adipocytes in Breast Cancer, the Thick and the Thin. Cells. 2020; 9(3):560. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9030560

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rybinska, Ilona; Agresti, Roberto; Trapani, Anna; Tagliabue, Elda; Triulzi, Tiziana. 2020. "Adipocytes in Breast Cancer, the Thick and the Thin" Cells 9, no. 3: 560. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9030560

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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