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Mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation Enzymes and NAD+ Metabolism: A Focus on Diseases and Therapeutic Perspectives

1
Institute of Sciences of Food Productions, National Research Council of Italy, via Monteroni 7, 73100 Lecce, Italy
2
Institute for the Experimental Endocrinology and Oncology, National Research Council of Italy, Via Sergio Pansini 5, 80131 Naples, Italy
3
Institute for the Experimental Endocrinology and Oncology, National Research Council of Italy, Via Tommaso de Amicis 95, 80145 Naples, Italy
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cells 2021, 10(1), 128; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10010128
Received: 20 November 2020 / Revised: 5 January 2021 / Accepted: 5 January 2021 / Published: 11 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Protein Mono-ADP-Ribosylation in the Control of Cell Functions)
Mono(ADP-ribose) transferases and mono(ADP-ribosyl)ating sirtuins use NAD+ to perform the mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation, a simple form of post-translational modification of proteins and, in some cases, of nucleic acids. The availability of NAD+ is a limiting step and an essential requisite for NAD+ consuming enzymes. The synthesis and degradation of NAD+, as well as the transport of its key intermediates among cell compartments, play a vital role in the maintenance of optimal NAD+ levels, which are essential for the regulation of NAD+-utilizing enzymes. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge of NAD+ metabolism, highlighting the functional liaison with mono(ADP-ribosyl)ating enzymes, such as the well-known ARTD10 (also named PARP10), SIRT6, and SIRT7. To this aim, we discuss the link of these enzymes with NAD+ metabolism and chronic diseases, such as cancer, degenerative disorders and aging. View Full-Text
Keywords: ADP-ribosyl transferase (ADPRT); Mono ADP-ribose transferases (mARTs); cholera-toxin-like ARTs (ARTCs); Diphtheria-toxin-like ARTs (ARTDs); Sirtuins (Sirt); NAD precursors ADP-ribosyl transferase (ADPRT); Mono ADP-ribose transferases (mARTs); cholera-toxin-like ARTs (ARTCs); Diphtheria-toxin-like ARTs (ARTDs); Sirtuins (Sirt); NAD precursors
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MDPI and ACS Style

Poltronieri, P.; Celetti, A.; Palazzo, L. Mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation Enzymes and NAD+ Metabolism: A Focus on Diseases and Therapeutic Perspectives. Cells 2021, 10, 128. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10010128

AMA Style

Poltronieri P, Celetti A, Palazzo L. Mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation Enzymes and NAD+ Metabolism: A Focus on Diseases and Therapeutic Perspectives. Cells. 2021; 10(1):128. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10010128

Chicago/Turabian Style

Poltronieri, Palmiro; Celetti, Angela; Palazzo, Luca. 2021. "Mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation Enzymes and NAD+ Metabolism: A Focus on Diseases and Therapeutic Perspectives" Cells 10, no. 1: 128. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10010128

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