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Article

Cattle Horn Shavings: A Possible Nitrogen Source for Apple Trees

1
Lithuanian Research Centre for Agriculture and Forestry, Institute of Horticulture, Kaunas st 30, 54333 Babtai, Lithuania
2
Agrochemical Research Laboratory, Lithuanian Research Centre for Agriculture and Forestry, Savanoriai ave. 287, 50127 Kaunas, Lithuania
3
Department of Horticulture, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research—NIBIO Ullensvang, Ulensvangvegen 1005, NO-5781 Lofthus, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Ioannis E. Papadakis and Marco Landi
Agronomy 2021, 11(3), 540; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11030540
Received: 4 February 2021 / Revised: 9 March 2021 / Accepted: 11 March 2021 / Published: 12 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mineral Nutrition of Fruit Trees)
The circular economy concept promotes the recycling of agricultural waste. This study was aimed at investigating the effects of cattle horn shavings on apple tree nitrogen nutrition. Ligol apple trees on P 60 rootstock were the object of the study. The experiment was conducted in the experimental orchard of the Institute of Horticulture, Lithuanian Research Centre for Agriculture and Forestry, from 2015 to 2018. Two fertiliser rates were tested: 50 and 100 kg/ha N. Horn shavings (14.1% N) were applied at the end of autumn or at the beginning of vegetation in the spring and in one treatment 100 kg/ha N rate was divided into two equal parts and applied both in autumn and spring. The effects of the horn shavings were compared with the effects of ammonium nitrate (34.4% N) and the unfertilised treatment. The lowest mineral nitrogen content was found in the unfertilised orchard soil and the soil fertilised with horn shavings in the spring at 50 kg/ha N equivalent. In all other cases, the fertilisers increased the soil’s mineral nitrogen content. The lowest leaf nitrogen content was found in apple trees that grew in the unfertilised orchard soil or soil fertilised in the spring with 50 kg/ha N of horn shavings (1.58–2.13%). In other cases, leaf nitrogen content was higher (1.77–2.17%). The apple trees with the lowest leaf nitrogen content produced the smallest average yield (34.5–36.6 t/ha). The highest yield was recorded from fruit trees fertilised with 50 kg/ha N of ammonium nitrate applied in spring or horn shavings applied in autumn (42.4 and 41.4 t/ha, respectively). The influence of horn shavings on the other studied parameters was similar to that of ammonium nitrate. Horn shavings, like nitrogen fertiliser, could facilitate nitrogen nutrition management in apple trees, especially in organic orchards, where the use of synthetic fertilisers is prohibited. View Full-Text
Keywords: leaf nitrogen; mineral nitrogen; soil; yield leaf nitrogen; mineral nitrogen; soil; yield
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lanauskas, J.; Uselis, N.; Buskienė, L.; Mažeika, R.; Staugaitis, G.; Kviklys, D. Cattle Horn Shavings: A Possible Nitrogen Source for Apple Trees. Agronomy 2021, 11, 540. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11030540

AMA Style

Lanauskas J, Uselis N, Buskienė L, Mažeika R, Staugaitis G, Kviklys D. Cattle Horn Shavings: A Possible Nitrogen Source for Apple Trees. Agronomy. 2021; 11(3):540. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11030540

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lanauskas, Juozas, Nobertas Uselis, Loreta Buskienė, Romas Mažeika, Gediminas Staugaitis, and Darius Kviklys. 2021. "Cattle Horn Shavings: A Possible Nitrogen Source for Apple Trees" Agronomy 11, no. 3: 540. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11030540

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