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Article

Feeding the Microbes: A Strategy to Control Verticillium Wilt

1
Laboratory of Phytopathology, Agricultural University of Athens, 75 Iera Odos, 11855 Athens, Greece
2
Centro de Ciencias Genómicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Av. Universidad 2001, 62210 Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Nikolaos Nikoloudakis and Iakovos Pantelides
Agronomy 2021, 11(10), 1946; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11101946
Received: 28 August 2021 / Revised: 22 September 2021 / Accepted: 23 September 2021 / Published: 28 September 2021
Verticillium dahliae is one of the most devastating soilborne pathogens for horticulture production. The pathogen has a broad host range and currently there is no effective chemical disease management, therefore, novel sustainable integrated disease management strategies should be considered. In this respect, we questioned whether the soil application of common microbiological growth media can influence the plant—microbe interactions and, subsequently, offer protection against V. dahliae. Indeed, the addition of Nutrient Broth (NB) and Potato Dextrose (PD) in non-sterilized soil reduced Verticillium wilt symptoms in eggplants. The addition of NB in sterilized soil did not reduce the disease symptoms compared to controls, however the addition of PD enhanced plant protection against V. dahliae. Following the results of a split root bioassay in eggplants, the possibility that NB and PD triggered the plant defense mechanisms against V. dahliae was excluded, since NB and PD did not reduce wilt symptom. Therefore, PD may be used as an easy food source for V. dahliae, detouring the pathogen from the root system of plants, while NB may affect the soil microbiome by enhancing antagonism in rhizosphere, or antagonistic interaction between V. dahliae and rhizospheric microbiome. Subsequently, several bacterial strains were isolated from the NB-treated rhizosphere and examined for their biocontrol activity against V. dahliae. Among the examined strains, a Pseudomonas putida strain, Z13, significantly reduced Veticillium severity and incidence under greenhouse conditions. View Full-Text
Keywords: biological control; plant diseases; Pseudomonas putida; soilborne diseases; vascular wilts; Verticillium dahliae biological control; plant diseases; Pseudomonas putida; soilborne diseases; vascular wilts; Verticillium dahliae
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ziazia, P.; Poulaki, E.G.; Gkizi, D.; Lozano, L.; Serrano, M.; Tjamos, S.E. Feeding the Microbes: A Strategy to Control Verticillium Wilt. Agronomy 2021, 11, 1946. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11101946

AMA Style

Ziazia P, Poulaki EG, Gkizi D, Lozano L, Serrano M, Tjamos SE. Feeding the Microbes: A Strategy to Control Verticillium Wilt. Agronomy. 2021; 11(10):1946. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11101946

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ziazia, Paraskevi, Eirini G. Poulaki, Danai Gkizi, Luis Lozano, Mario Serrano, and Sotirios E. Tjamos 2021. "Feeding the Microbes: A Strategy to Control Verticillium Wilt" Agronomy 11, no. 10: 1946. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11101946

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