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Article

Evaluating Phthalate Contaminant Migration Using Thermal Desorption–Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (TD–GC–MS)

Consumer & Retail Service Division, SGS Japan Inc., YBP East Tower 12F, 134 Godo-cho, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-0005, Japan
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Polymers 2019, 11(4), 683; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11040683
Received: 19 March 2019 / Revised: 12 April 2019 / Accepted: 12 April 2019 / Published: 15 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymer Mass Spectrometry)
This study describes a methodology for evaluating regulatory levels of phthalate contamination. By collecting experimental data on short-term phthalate migration using thermal desorption–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (TD–GC–MS), the migration of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) to polyethylene (PE) was found to be expressed by the Fickian approximation model, which was originally proposed for solid (PVC)/liquid (solvent) migration of phthalates. Consequently, good data correlation was obtained using the Fickian approximation model with a diffusion coefficient of 4.2 × 10−12 cm2/s for solid (PVC)/ solid (PE) migration of DEHP at 25 °C. Results showed that temporary contact with plasticized polymers under a normal, foreseeable condition may not pose an immediate risk of being contaminated by phthalates at regulatory levels. However, as phthalates are small organic molecules designed to be dispersed in a variety of polymers as plasticizers at a high compounding ratio, the risk of migration-related contamination can be high in comparison with other additives, especially under high temperatures. With these considerations in mind, the methodology for examining regulatory levels of phthalate contamination using TD–GC–MS has been successfully demonstrated from the viewpoint of its applicability to solid (PVC)/solid (PE) migration of phthalates. View Full-Text
Keywords: phthalate migration; contaminant; thermal desorption; gas chromatography–mass spectrometry; additives; plasticizer; Fick’s law; solid/solid interface; plasticized PVC phthalate migration; contaminant; thermal desorption; gas chromatography–mass spectrometry; additives; plasticizer; Fick’s law; solid/solid interface; plasticized PVC
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ouchi, Y.; Yanagisawa, H.; Fujimaki, S. Evaluating Phthalate Contaminant Migration Using Thermal Desorption–Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (TD–GC–MS). Polymers 2019, 11, 683. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11040683

AMA Style

Ouchi Y, Yanagisawa H, Fujimaki S. Evaluating Phthalate Contaminant Migration Using Thermal Desorption–Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (TD–GC–MS). Polymers. 2019; 11(4):683. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11040683

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ouchi, Yukihiro, Hiroyuki Yanagisawa, and Shigehiko Fujimaki. 2019. "Evaluating Phthalate Contaminant Migration Using Thermal Desorption–Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (TD–GC–MS)" Polymers 11, no. 4: 683. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym11040683

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