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Simulating Real World Soot-Catalyst Contact Conditions for Lab-Scale Catalytic Soot Oxidation Studies

1
Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA
2
Cummins Inc., 1900 McKinley Ave., Columbus, IN 47201, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Catalysts 2018, 8(6), 247; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8060247
Received: 1 June 2018 / Revised: 10 June 2018 / Accepted: 12 June 2018 / Published: 14 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic Oxidation in Environmental Protection)
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Abstract

In diesel soot oxidation studies, both well-defined model soot and a reliable means to simulate realistic contact conditions with catalysts are crucial. This study is the first attempt in the field to establish a lab-scale continuous flame soot deposition method in simulating the “contact condition” of soot and a structured diesel particulate filter (DPF) catalyst. The properties of this flame soot were examined by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for structure analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) for surface area analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for reactivity and kinetics analysis. For validation purposes, catalytic oxidation of Tiki® soot using the simulated contact condition was conducted to compare with the diesel particulates collected from a real diesel engine exhaust system. It was found that the flame soot is more uniform and controllable than similar samples of collected diesel particulates. The change in T50 due to the presence of the catalyst is very similar in both cases, implying that the flame deposit method is able to produce comparably realistic contact conditions to that resulting from the real exhaust system. Comparing against the expensive engine testing, this novel method allows researchers to quickly set up a procedure in the laboratory scale to reveal the catalytic soot oxidation properties in a comparable loose contact condition. View Full-Text
Keywords: diesel soot oxidation; contact condition; diesel particulate filter; catalytic DPF; soot oxidation kinetics; flame soot diesel soot oxidation; contact condition; diesel particulate filter; catalytic DPF; soot oxidation kinetics; flame soot
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Su, C.; Wang, Y.; Kumar, A.; McGinn, P.J. Simulating Real World Soot-Catalyst Contact Conditions for Lab-Scale Catalytic Soot Oxidation Studies. Catalysts 2018, 8, 247.

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