Next Article in Journal
Prognostic Gene Expression, Stemness and Immune Microenvironment in Pediatric Tumors
Previous Article in Journal
Targeting Mitochondria by SS-31 Ameliorates the Whole Body Energy Status in Cancer- and Chemotherapy-Induced Cachexia
Previous Article in Special Issue
Bispecific Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy for B Cell Malignancies and Multiple Myeloma
Review

CAR-T Therapy, the End of a Chapter or the Beginning of a New One?

1
School of Cancer & Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Life & Sciences & Medicine, King’s College, London SE1 9NH, UK
2
ASYS Pharmaceutical Consultants-APC Inc 2, Bedford, NS B4A 4L2, Canada
Academic Editors: Avery D. Posey and Kole T. Roybal
Cancers 2021, 13(4), 853; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13040853
Received: 30 January 2021 / Revised: 14 February 2021 / Accepted: 14 February 2021 / Published: 18 February 2021
CAR-T therapy is a breakthrough treatment in our fight against cancer. It was recently approved for the treatment of advanced diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia after the failure of previous multiple therapies. The positive results achieved in the registration studies for those patients were remarkable. Unfortunately, this was not the end of this chapter. Disease relapses occur in the range of 30–60% of patients treated with CAR-T therapy. Cytokine release syndrome represents a major side effect for treatment with CAR-T therapy. Notwithstanding, the high positive results triggered the start of a huge research activity of CAR-T therapy in other haematologic malignancies such as acute myelogenous leukaemia, Hodgkin’s disease, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, and multiple myeloma. The research is also trying to overcome the hurdles stated above. These activities represent a new chapter in the management of haematologic malignancies with CAR-T therapy.
Chimeric antigen receptor-T (CAR-T) therapy targeting CD19 has revolutionised the treatment of advanced acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The ability to specifically target the cancer cells has shown high positive results as reported in the registration studies. The success of CAR-T therapy in the first two indications led to the initiation of a large number of studies testing CAR-T therapy in different haematologic tumours such as acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML), Hodgkin’s disease (HD), chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), multiple myeloma (MM), as well as different solid tumours. Unfortunately, relapses occurred in patients treated with CAR-T therapy, calling for the development of effective subsequent therapies. Likewise, this novel mechanism of action was also accompanied by a different toxicity profile, such as cytokine release syndrome (CRS). Patients’ access to the treatment is still limited by its cost. Notwithstanding, this did not prohibit further development of this new therapy to treat other malignancies. This research activity of CAR-T therapy moves it from being used as an end-stage treatment for ALL and DLBCL to a new therapeutic option for a wide range of patients with different haematologic and solid tumours. View Full-Text
Keywords: chimeric antigen receptor-t; CAR-T therapy; haematologic malignancies; solid tumours; cytokine release syndrome chimeric antigen receptor-t; CAR-T therapy; haematologic malignancies; solid tumours; cytokine release syndrome
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Mostafa Kamel, Y. CAR-T Therapy, the End of a Chapter or the Beginning of a New One? Cancers 2021, 13, 853. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13040853

AMA Style

Mostafa Kamel Y. CAR-T Therapy, the End of a Chapter or the Beginning of a New One? Cancers. 2021; 13(4):853. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13040853

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mostafa Kamel, Yasser. 2021. "CAR-T Therapy, the End of a Chapter or the Beginning of a New One?" Cancers 13, no. 4: 853. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13040853

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop