Next Article in Journal
Down-Regulation of Cannabinoid Type 1 (CB1) Receptor and its Downstream Signaling Pathways in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer
Next Article in Special Issue
Impact of Surgery on Long-Term Results of Hearing in Neurofibromatosis Type-2 Associated Vestibular Schwannomas
Previous Article in Journal
Exercise Intervention Improves Clinical Outcomes, but the “Time of Session” is Crucial for Better Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Open AccessArticle

NF1 Patients Receiving Breast Cancer Screening: Insights from The Ontario High Risk Breast Screening Program

1
Program for Genetics and Genome Biology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8, Canada
2
Familial Breast and Ovarian Cancer Clinic, Princess Margaret Hospital Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON M5G 2C1, Canada
3
Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada
4
Average and High-Risk Ontario Breast Screening Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON M5G 2C1, Canada
5
Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5T 1W7, Canada
6
Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Breast Imaging, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Sinai Health System and Women’s College Hospital, Toronto, ON M5G 2C1 and M5S 1B2, Canada
7
Prenatal Diagnosis and Medical Genetics Program, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON M5G 1X5, Canada
8
University Health Network, Toronto, ON M5GC4, Canada
9
Familial Breast and Ovarian Cancer Clinic, Division of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON M5G 2C1, Canada
10
Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cancers 2019, 11(5), 707; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers11050707
Received: 10 April 2019 / Revised: 4 May 2019 / Accepted: 17 May 2019 / Published: 22 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Neurofibromatosis)
Neurofibromatosis Type I (NF1) is caused by variants in neurofibromin (NF1). NF1 predisposes to a variety of benign and malignant tumor types, including breast cancer. Women with NF1 <50 years of age possess an up to five-fold increased risk of developing breast cancer compared with the general population. Impaired emotional functioning is reported as a comorbidity that may influence the participation of NF1 patients in regular clinical surveillance despite their increased risk of breast and other cancers. Despite emphasis on breast cancer surveillance in women with NF1, the uptake and feasibility of high-risk screening programs in this population remains unclear. A retrospective chart review between 2014–2018 of female NF1 patients seen at the Elizabeth Raab Neurofibromatosis Clinic (ERNC) in Ontario was conducted to examine the uptake of high-risk breast cancer screening, radiologic findings, and breast cancer characteristics. 61 women with pathogenic variants in NF1 enrolled in the high-risk Ontario breast screening program (HR-OBSP); 95% completed at least one high-risk breast screening modality, and four were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. Our findings support the integration of a formal breast screening programs in clinical management of NF1 patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: breast cancer; neurofibromatosis type I; high-risk screening; screening uptake breast cancer; neurofibromatosis type I; high-risk screening; screening uptake
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Maani, N.; Westergard, S.; Yang, J.; Scaranelo, A.M.; Telesca, S.; Thain, E.; Schachter, N.F.; McCuaig, J.M.; Kim, R.H. NF1 Patients Receiving Breast Cancer Screening: Insights from The Ontario High Risk Breast Screening Program. Cancers 2019, 11, 707.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop