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Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors and Phenotypical Transformation of Cancer Cells

1
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical University of Lublin, Chodzki 1 St., 20-093 Lublin, Poland
2
Postgraduate School of Molecular Medicine, Medical University of Warsaw, Trojdena 2a St., 02-091 Warsaw, Poland
3
The First Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Gynecology, Medical University of Lublin, Staszica 16 St., 20-081 Lublin, Poland
4
Tumor Immunology Laboratory, Medical University of Lublin, Staszica 16 St., 20-081 Lublin, Poland
5
Faculty of Science and Engineering, Cell Biology, Abo Akademi University, Tykistokatu 6A, 20520 Turku, Finland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Cancers 2019, 11(2), 148; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers11020148
Received: 23 December 2018 / Revised: 18 January 2019 / Accepted: 22 January 2019 / Published: 27 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Collection Histone Modification in Cancer)
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PDF [6116 KB, uploaded 27 January 2019]
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Abstract

Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) are a group of potent epigenetic drugs which have been investigated for their therapeutic potential in various clinical disorders, including hematological malignancies and solid tumors. Currently, several HDIs are already in clinical use and many more are on clinical trials. HDIs have shown efficacy to inhibit initiation and progression of cancer cells. Nevertheless, both pro-invasive and anti-invasive activities of HDIs have been reported, questioning their impact in carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to compile and discuss the most recent findings on the effect of HDIs on the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process in human cancers. We have summarized the impact of HDIs on epithelial (E-cadherin, β-catenin) and mesenchymal (N-cadherin, vimentin) markers, EMT activators (TWIST, SNAIL, SLUG, SMAD, ZEB), as well as morphology, migration and invasion potential of cancer cells. We further discuss the use of HDIs as monotherapy or in combination with existing or novel anti-neoplastic drugs in relation to changes in EMT. View Full-Text
Keywords: cancer; HDI; HDAC; EMT; MET; cadherin; catenin; vimentin; migration; invasion cancer; HDI; HDAC; EMT; MET; cadherin; catenin; vimentin; migration; invasion
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Wawruszak, A.; Kalafut, J.; Okon, E.; Czapinski, J.; Halasa, M.; Przybyszewska, A.; Miziak, P.; Okla, K.; Rivero-Muller, A.; Stepulak, A. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors and Phenotypical Transformation of Cancer Cells. Cancers 2019, 11, 148.

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