Next Article in Journal
Biomonitoring of Enniatin B1 and Its Phase I Metabolites in Human Urine: First Large-Scale Study
Next Article in Special Issue
Shiga Toxin Uptake and Sequestration in Extracellular Vesicles Is Mediated by Its B-Subunit
Previous Article in Journal
Toxicokinetics of Hydrolyzed Fumonisin B1 after Single Oral or Intravenous Bolus to Broiler Chickens Fed a Control or a Fumonisins-Contaminated Diet
Previous Article in Special Issue
Molecular Biology of Escherichia coli Shiga Toxins’ Effects on Mammalian Cells
Open AccessArticle

Metabolic Traits of Bovine Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) Strains with Different Colonization Properties

1
Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut/Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Institute of Molecular Pathogenesis, Naumburger Str. 96a, 07743 Jena, Germany
2
Free University Berlin, Institute of Microbiology and Epizootics, Robert-von-Ostertag-Str. 7-13, 14163 Berlin, Germany
3
University of Greifswald, Pharmaceutical Microbiology, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 17, 17489 Greifswald, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
In memoriam.
Toxins 2020, 12(6), 414; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins12060414
Received: 15 May 2020 / Revised: 10 June 2020 / Accepted: 17 June 2020 / Published: 22 June 2020
Cattle harbor Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in their intestinal tract, thereby providing these microorganisms with an ecological niche, but without this colonization leading to any clinical signs. In a preceding study, genotypic characterization of bovine STEC isolates unveiled that their ability to colonize cattle persistently (STECper) or only sporadically (STECspo) is more closely associated with the overall composition of the accessory rather than the core genome. However, the colonization pattern could not be unequivocally linked to the possession of classical virulence genes. This study aimed at assessing, therefore, if the presence of certain phenotypic traits in the strains determines their colonization pattern and if these can be traced back to distinctive genetic features. STECspo strains produced significantly more biofilm than STECper when incubated at lower temperatures. Key substrates, the metabolism of which showed a significant association with colonization type, were glyoxylic acid and L-rhamnose, which were utilized by STECspo, but not or only by some STECper. Genomic sequences of the respective glc and rha operons contained mutations and frameshifts in uptake and/or regulatory genes, particularly in STECper. These findings suggest that STECspo conserved features leveraging survival in the environment, whereas the acquisition of a persistent colonization phenotype in the cattle reservoir was accompanied by the loss of metabolic properties and genomic mutations in the underlying genetic pathways. View Full-Text
Keywords: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli; STEC; colonization type; Omnilog; metabolic activity; biofilm; acid resistance; bovine; reservoir Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli; STEC; colonization type; Omnilog; metabolic activity; biofilm; acid resistance; bovine; reservoir
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Barth, S.A.; Weber, M.; Schaufler, K.; Berens, C.; Geue, L.; Menge, C. Metabolic Traits of Bovine Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) Strains with Different Colonization Properties. Toxins 2020, 12, 414.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop